A colorful morning walk through Little Italy.

Colorful art in the sidewalk in San Diego's Little Italy neighborhood. A fisherman sells his fresh catch to a family by the ocean.
Colorful art in the sidewalk in San Diego’s Little Italy neighborhood. A fisherman sells his fresh catch to a family by the ocean.

I walked through Little Italy yesterday morning on my way to catch the trolley. I was struck by the quiet beauty all around me. So I tried to capture a few moments with some photos.

In the interest of full disclosure, two or three of these photos are from walks on other mornings. It seems my every journey through Little Italy is magical.

It's still early morning in Little Italy, so perhaps everyone isn't quite ready to tackle the day.
It’s still early morning in Little Italy, so perhaps everyone isn’t quite ready to tackle the day.
Morning sunlight slants in to touch the side of a newly painted Victorian house near a modern hotel.
Morning sunlight slants in to touch the side of a newly painted Victorian house near a modern hotel.
Michelangelo watches--and so does a construction worker--as a new development rises in the heart of Little Italy.
Michelangelo watches–and so does a construction worker–as a new development rises in the heart of Little Italy.
This huge new development will include the public gathering space Piazza Famiglia.
This huge new development will include the public gathering space Piazza Famiglia.
Sweeping up some leaves, preparing for another day.
Sweeping up some leaves, preparing for another day.
A Little Italy Association maintenance truck has pulled up beside a wheelbarrow full of flowers.
A Little Italy Association maintenance truck has pulled up beside a wheelbarrow full of flowers.
Wisdom along the roof of one building. Do right. Fear nothing. Keep it simple. Find what you love.
Wisdom along the roof of one building. Do right. Fear nothing. Keep it simple. Find what you love.
A big red chair awaits on Little Italy's popular but now quiet India Street.
A big red chair awaits on Little Italy’s popular but now quiet India Street.
Mary and Christ Child welcome the faithful above the entrance to Our Lady of the Rosary church.
Mary and Christ Child welcome the faithful above the entrance to Our Lady of the Rosary church.
Classic bearded face provides a building wall with sculptural ornamentation.
Classic bearded face provides a building wall with sculptural ornamentation.
Little Italy San Diego street lamp banner celebrates entertainer Lady Gaga, whose real name is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta.
Little Italy San Diego street lamp banner celebrates entertainer Lady Gaga, whose real name is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta.
Fanciful birdhouses sit on a fence between homes in Little Italy.
Fanciful birdhouses sit on a fence between homes in Little Italy.
Be like a pineapple! Wear a crown. Stand tall and be sweet on the inside.
Be like a pineapple! Wear a crown. Stand tall and be sweet on the inside.
Greenery flows like cascading water from planters on the outside wall of the Sorrento Ristorante.
Greenery flows like cascading water from planters on the outside wall of the Sorrento Ristorante.
A quiet moment before the day's business begins.
A quiet moment before the day’s business begins.
Life and color fill the streets of the Little Italy neighborhood in downtown San Diego.
Life and color fill the streets of the Little Italy neighborhood in downtown San Diego.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

New mural in San Diego extols humility, nobility.

A new mural in downtown San Diego contains great wisdom, extolling two human values. Be humble. Be noble.
A new mural in downtown San Diego contains great wisdom, extolling two human values. Be humble. Be noble.

A new street mural in downtown San Diego is being completed even as I post this! It’s being painted on a large parking lot wall just south of C Street, between Front Street and 1st Avenue. Check it out!

The artist, Trek Thunder Kelly, who operates out of Venice Beach, California, is known for creating unique designs that mix oddly contrasting messages and images. The cool mural that he’s working on at this very moment is sponsored by the internet retail company Zappos, and it extols one of their stated core values: humility. I couldn’t help but notice the quote highlights another important human virtue: nobility.

Be humble. You are made of earth.
Be noble. You are made of stars.

These powerful true words come from a Serbian proverb.

When I spoke to Trek, it sounded like he’d paint some of the stars with glow-in-the-dark phosphorescent paint. At this point he has a limited supply, so it will have to be artistically applied. I can’t wait to see the completed artwork!

Be humble. You are made of earth. Be noble. You are made of stars.
Be humble. You are made of earth. Be noble. You are made of stars.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

To read a few philosophical short stories, click Short Stories by Richard.

Cold War history: How one man stopped World War III.

To the Brink of WAR. A sound and light exhibit at the Maritime Museum of San Diego based on true Cold War events during the Cuban Missile Crisis.
To the Brink of WAR. A sound and light exhibit at the Maritime Museum of San Diego based on a true Cold War event during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

A fantastic exhibit recently opened at the Maritime Museum of San Diego. You’ll find it aboard their B-39 Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine. The exhibit, using videos, a light show and other exciting effects, tells the story of how one man likely saved the world.

At the height of the Cold War, during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, a Soviet commander on the B-59, another Foxtrot-class submarine, spoke a few cautious words. Those words might have averted World War III and worldwide nuclear destruction.

The B-59 was one of four Soviet submarines that were sent to the Caribbean Sea to support ships delivering arms to Cuba. In October of 1962 the B-59 was detected by the United States, and Navy destroyers began dropping the sort of depth charges that are used for training–practice depth charges with very little explosive impact. It was the US Navy’s intention to have the sub surface in order to gain positive identification.

Aboard the B-59, however, batteries were running critically low, the air-conditioning had ceased working, and if the submarine didn’t surface eventually the crew would perish. They hadn’t had radio communication with Moscow for several days. The captain of the submarine, Valentin Grigorievitch Savitsky, believed that war had probably begun. He wanted to launch their T-5 nuclear torpedo at the USS Randolph aircraft carrier.

The exhibit inside the Maritime Museum of San Diego’s Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine allows visitors to relive those tense moments. They’ll hear how sub-flotilla commander Vasili Arkhipov, also on the B-59, reasoned that a conflict might not have started, and that firing their “Special Weapon” nuclear torpedo would certainly result in World War III. His calm words of council prevailed, the sub surfaced peacefully, and today visitors to the museum can appreciate his level-headed wisdom, and the extreme pressure that the crew of the B-59 felt on that fateful day.

Anyone visiting the exhibit should be prepared for very close quarters. Ducking and engaging in a variety of pretzel-like contortions while moving along the length of the submarine, one can appreciate how life must have been as a crewmember, even under normal circumstances. It’s definitely not a place for those who have claustrophobia!

Here are a few photos that give you a taste of what you’ll experience. Of course, enjoying the exhibit in person is a thousand times more interesting!

This man might have literally saved the world. Vasili Arkhipov argued against the B-59 captain's wishes to fire a nuclear torpedo against the U.S. aircraft carrier USS Randolph.
This man might have literally saved the world. Vasili Arkhipov argued against the B-59 captain’s determination to fire a nuclear torpedo against the U.S. aircraft carrier USS Randolph.
Today, the Maritime Museum of San Diego's B-39 Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine allows visitors to see what sub warfare was like during the Cold War, and to relive the crisis.
Today, the Maritime Museum of San Diego’s B-39 Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine allows visitors to see what sub warfare was like during the Cold War, and to relive the crisis.
Many signs containing interesting info can be read before boarding the B-39.
Many signs containing interesting info can be read before boarding the B-39.
Sign provides some details about the B-39. It could cruise 20,000 miles on diesel-electric power. It was built in Leningrad. It's design was generally based on late World War II German u-boats.
Sign provides some details about the B-39. It could cruise 20,000 miles on diesel-electric power. It was built in Leningrad. It’s design was generally based on late World War II German u-boats.
Life aboard a Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine is briefly described. Duty aboard a Foxtrot was not considered bad, but was often quite boring.
Life aboard a Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine is briefly described. Duty aboard a Foxtrot was not considered bad, but was often quite boring.
Sign shows main parts of the museum's current Cuban Missile Crisis exhibit. Inside the sub, one must nimbly climb through small circular openings!
Sign shows main parts of the museum’s current Cuban Missile Crisis exhibit. Inside the sub, one must nimbly climb through rather small circular openings!
I've ascended the gangway and I'm standing forward of the submarine's sail. I'll enter the forward torpedo room via some steps behind me.
I’ve ascended the gangway and I’m standing forward of the submarine’s sail (or fin). I’ll enter the forward torpedo room via some steps behind me.
Enter Here! And prepare to relive a tense moment in history, when the future of humankind teetered on the brink.
Enter Here! And prepare to relive a tense moment in history, when the future of humankind teetered on the brink.
Just inside the old Soviet sub. There's a video explaining the Cold War and beginning of the Cuban Missile Crisis, and many signs nearby. The B-59 was armed with a Special Weapon--one nuclear torpedo.
Just inside the old Soviet sub. There’s a video explaining the Cold War and beginning of the Cuban Missile Crisis, and many signs nearby. The B-59 was armed with a Special Weapon: one nuclear torpedo.
This museum torpedo represents what the B-59 Foxtrot carried back in 1962. A purple tip meant a particular torpedo had a nuclear warhead.
This museum torpedo represents what the B-59 Foxtrot carried back in 1962. A purple tip meant a particular torpedo had a nuclear warhead.
You might note this torpedo has a purple tip! To fire a nuclear weapon during the Cuban Missile Crisis would have certainly resulted in World War III.
You might note this torpedo has a purple tip! To fire a nuclear weapon during the Cuban Missile Crisis would have certainly resulted in World War III.
A Hair's Breadth from Nuclear War. President John F. Kennedy dealt with an extremely difficult crisis. Common sense, decisive action--and possibly some luck--helped the world avoid catastrophe.
A Hair’s Breadth from Nuclear War. President John F. Kennedy dealt with an extremely difficult crisis. Common sense, decisive action–and possibly some luck–helped the world avoid catastrophe.
It's no easy feat going from one section of the sub to another! A visitor is about to head into a narrow corridor enroute to the Control Room.
It’s no easy feat going from one section of the sub to another! A visitor is about to head into a narrow corridor en route to the Control Room.
Heading through the Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine. Tiny rooms on either side include the Captain's Cabin, the Officer's Wardroom, and Medical Exam Room.
Heading through the Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine. Tiny rooms on either side include the Captain’s Cabin, the Officer’s Wardroom, and Medical Exam Room.
A look into the Electronic Officer Cabin.
A look into the Electronic Officer Cabin.
The sonar room was critical to the safety of the submarine. Without sonar, the underwater vessel had no eyes.
The sonar room was critical to the safety of the submarine. Without sonar, the underwater vessel had no eyes.
A photo of equipment in one corner of the sonar room.
A photo of equipment in one corner of the sonar room.
Into the Main Control Room we go, the scene of a sound and light show reenacting those tense minutes before the B-59 chose to surface peacefully without firing their nuclear torpedo.
Into the Main Control Room we go, the scene of a sound and light show reenacting those tense minutes before the B-59 chose to surface peacefully without firing their nuclear torpedo.
Signs throughout the Maritime Museum of San Diego's Cuban Missile Crisis exhibit help visitors understand their position in the Foxtrot submarine.
Signs throughout the Maritime Museum of San Diego’s Cuban Missile Crisis exhibit help visitors understand their position in the Foxtrot submarine.
Photo includes the Foxtrot's helm, where a Soviet sailor steered the submarine by moving a lever left and right.
Photo includes the Foxtrot’s helm, where a Soviet sailor steered the submarine by moving a lever left and right.
Visitor inside the Maritime Museum of San Diego's B-39 submarine looks through the periscope. Red lights come on as depth charges are heard. A fateful decision must be quickly made.
Visitor inside the Maritime Museum of San Diego’s B-39 submarine looks through the periscope. Red lights come on as depth charges are heard. A fateful decision must be quickly made.
Voices from nearby speakers reenact tense discussions, then orders to the crew. The submarine captain wished to fire a nuclear torpedo; the level-headed flotilla commander convinced him not to.
Voices from nearby speakers reenact tense discussions, then orders to the crew. The submarine captain wished to fire a nuclear torpedo; the level-headed flotilla commander convinced him not to.
We've left the Control Room and are continuing along the center of the submarine. Here's part of the galley. The crew ate well by Soviet standards.
We’ve left the Control Room and are continuing along the center of the submarine. Here’s part of the galley. The crew ate well by Soviet standards–better than most ordinary citizens.
More knobs, switches, levers, buttons, dials, gauges and whatnot on the way to the Engine Room.
More knobs, switches, levers, buttons, dials, gauges and whatnot on the way to the Engine Room.
The engine room contains three turbo diesel engines that each put out 2000 horsepower. They drove three shafts connected to six-blade propellers.
The engine room contains three turbo diesel engines that each put out 2000 horsepower. They drove three shafts connected to six-blade propellers.
Another photo inside the museum's B-39 engine room. During the 1962 events, the B-59's batteries were low and the air conditioning had failed. Their hot engine room must have been intolerable.
Another photo inside the museum’s B-39 engine room. During the 1962 events, the B-59’s batteries were low and the air conditioning had failed. Their hot engine room must have been intolerable.
Now we're heading to the Motor Control Room.
Now we’re heading to the Motor Control Room.
Bunks for Enlisted Ratings line the corridor. These were shared by the crew and in constant use. No room to spare!
Bunks for Enlisted Ratings line the corridor. These were shared by the crew and in constant use. No room to spare!
A very tight squeeze!
A very tight squeeze!
And finally we've made our way into the After Torpedo Room, where visitors can watch a concluding video documentary. After surfacing peacefully, the B-59 eventually resubmerged and vanished.
And finally we’ve made our way into the After Torpedo Room, where visitors can watch a concluding video documentary. After surfacing peacefully, the B-59 eventually re-submerged and vanished.
School students left notes. It seems most really liked the tour! It's not every day one can see the interior of a Cold War Soviet submarine!
School students left notes. It seems most really liked the tour! It’s not every day one can see the interior of a Cold War Soviet submarine!
Climbing back out of the B-39 Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine, one of many vessels that are part of the Maritime Museum of San Diego.
Climbing back out of the B-39 Foxtrot-class Soviet submarine, one of many historic vessels that are part of the Maritime Museum of San Diego.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of fun photos for you to enjoy!

Wisdom, surfing and how people are like starfish.

Be kinder than necessary - for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle...
Be kinder than necessary – for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle…

Yesterday I walked through Ocean Beach. A few of my photographs seem to spell out a message about life.

I noticed that a small park at the corner of Sunset Cliffs and W. Point Loma Boulevard contained bits of wisdom. So did a formation of pelicans and a surfer near the OB pier.

Moving shadow in a small plaza at the corner of Sunset Cliffs and W. Point Loma Boulevard. Wisdom and love are written on an Ocean Beach wall.
Moving shadow in a small plaza at the corner of Sunset Cliffs and W. Point Loma Boulevard. Wisdom and love are written on an Ocean Beach wall.
Walking down a winding path toward Robb Field. Life is a one way meandering journey.
Walking down a winding path toward Robb Field. Life is a one way meandering journey.
Public art on an Ocean Beach wall. All starfish are beautiful, alike but different.
Public art on an Ocean Beach wall. All starfish are beautiful, alike but different.
A starfish is small but resilient. It moves and bends in life's unceasing tides.
A starfish is small but resilient. It moves and bends with life’s unceasing tides.
A starfish that suffers loss will regenerate. During its short life, it is a survivor.
A starfish that suffers loss will regenerate. During its short life, it is a survivor.
Bicycling a short distance down life's path. Be kind. The unknown awaits around some turns.
Bicycling a short distance down life’s path. Be kind. The unknown awaits around some turns.
A glimpse of immensity beyond the beach. The OB pier extends a short way toward the mysterious horizon.
A glimpse of immensity beyond the beach. The OB pier extends a short way toward the mysterious horizon.
Entering the ocean. A place of beauty, power, pleasure, danger. Like life itself.
Entering the ocean. A place of beauty, power, pleasure, danger. Like life itself.
Pelicans fly in formation to ease their path through the air.
Pelicans fly in formation to ease their path through the air.
Riding a wave. A short trip upon the mighty ocean back toward familiar land.
Riding a wave. A short trip upon the mighty ocean back toward familiar land.
Live fully. Ride well. Enjoy life. We each are very small. Be forgiving. Be kind.
Live fully. Ride well. Enjoy life. We each are very small. Be forgiving. Be kind.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Do you like to read short pieces of thought-provoking fiction? You might enjoy checking out Short Stories by Richard.

How to stimulate your mind, see the world more fully.

Leaf on bark.
Leaf on bark.

Life can be very busy.  Some days go by in a blur.  So I often don’t have time to fully appreciate the enormous, wonderful world that surrounds me.

That’s one reason why I love to walk, haul my camera around, and write.

Unfortunately, one must constantly attend to life’s small stuff. You know–daily business, errands, dull routines. But I’ve learned that I can always–no matter where I am or what I’m doing–open myself to new wonder. Here are a few unusual mental exercises. They help to stimulate your mind, so that you can see the world more fully.

1. Name every object you see.

That’s right! As you go about during an ordinary day, find the word or words that describe every object you happen to see. In your mind, name everything that exists in front of your eyes. Add descriptive adjectives and adverbs. You’ll see more than you did before, and perhaps in a new light. You’ll have greater awareness of the world around you, even the small details.

2. Search for objects of a specific color.

Select a random color. Then as you move through your day, consciously search your surroundings for ordinary objects of that color. Do this and you’ll become acutely aware of the appearance of things–not just their color. You’ll appreciate the world’s richness and innate beauty. You’ll see how all things fit together. Try it!

3. Search the horizon, and imagine what’s beyond it.

From time to time, when outdoors, focus your eyes on the horizon. What can you see there? Can you imagine what probably (or possibly) lies just beyond the horizon? What do you think is going on in that unseen place? Or better yet, on a pitch black night look up at the stars. What is going on there?

This exercise broadens your view of the universe and helps you grasp its entirety with your mind. That is–to the extent we humans can grasp such immensity!

4. Examine the world inches from your eyes.

Standing next to something? Put your nose right up close and examine it! Do you find yourself in a boring old office building’s lobby that has a painting on a wall? Look at the brush strokes! Waiting on a sidewalk under an ordinary tree? Look closely at the bark or the leaves!

Closely examine those things that happen to be nearby. Analyze precisely.  Renew your wonder. Perhaps pretend you’re a giant, surveying a fascinating, miniature world. Because in a sense, we all ARE giants–when the mind is stimulated, curious and growing.

5. Imagine the world in the future, or in the past.

Where are you? Slowly turn to look all around. Now imagine your immediate surroundings in the near or distant past, or in the near or distant future.

San Diego, the bustling place I call home, is relatively new compared to most cities. A couple hundred years ago–which isn’t long at all–Southern California was essentially a wilderness. So it’s interesting to imagine San Diego with no buildings, no streets, almost no sign of human life. Just canyons and hills, covered with sagebrush and dry chaparral.

How did my growing city appear a hundred years ago? Fifty years ago? And why do things appear as they do today? How might things change tomorrow? A hundred years from now? A thousand years from now? A million years from now?

This unusual mental exercise helps you to appreciate the world’s fullness in both space and time. And it stimulates your imagination!

6. Imagine people around you at different stages in life.

You and I are alike in many ways. Living life, by definition, is all that we can know. By observing the people around you more fully, perhaps you can better understand humanity and yourself.

Imagine how strangers around you might physically appear at different stages of life. Do you see an elderly person? Try to imagine how they looked when they were a child. Do you see a child? Imagine how they’ll appear when they grow old.

This is an old trick many writers use when creating a character sketch. It really makes the observer think.  It puts our short lives in perspective!

7. Ask yourself what a nearby person will do next.

Here’s another clever trick. Do you see a stranger nearby? Watch them for a bit from the corner of your eye. What do you think they’ll do next? Then afterward, ask yourself why your guess was right or wrong.

By gaining insights into human behavior, you’ll better appreciate the paths and turns of other minds. And you’ll see why humans have fashioned their world as it is. For better or worse.

And, of course, you’ll learn something about your own inclinations and perceptions.

8. Understand what people are thinking.

One more mental exercise that anyone can try. This is quite possibly the most difficult. Imagine or deduce what a nearby person is thinking. Can you see their thoughts in their eyes? In their gestures? In their actions?

How do you think they see the world?

Do you like to read short pieces of thought-provoking fiction? You might enjoy checking out Short Stories by Richard.

Signs containing wisdom enlighten the city.

A small handwritten sign seen in a San Diego window. The danger of falling in love is falling in love.
A small handwritten sign seen in a San Diego window. The danger of falling in love is falling in love.

Here are some wise (or seemingly wise) signs that I’ve photographed during my walks around downtown San Diego. Some enlighten passersby, some add a touch of lightness or levity to daily life.

If there is one thing that Republicans and Democrats can agree on is that coffee is Great! Indeed, many things in life are.
If there is one thing that Republicans and Democrats can agree on is that coffee is Great! Indeed, many things in life are.
Perhaps this is wise. Perhaps not. Play today, work mañana.
Perhaps this is wise. Perhaps not. Play today, work mañana.
Hazard. One word warns of unseen danger under the smooth, peaceful water of San Diego Bay.
Hazard. One small word to the wise, warning of unseen danger under the deceptively peaceful water of San Diego Bay.
More wisdom inside another downtown window. Live in the moment, take chances, be here now, tell someone how much they mean to you.
More wise philosophy inside a downtown window. Live in the moment, take chances, be here now, tell someone how much they mean to you.
Sign on San Diego sidewalk. With our thoughts we make the world. Buddha.
Sign on San Diego sidewalk with a powerful, insightful quote. With our thoughts we make the world. Buddha.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Do you like to read short philosophical stories? You might enjoy checking out Short Stories by Richard.

Funny cooking pictures and quotes!

People who love to eat are always the best people. Julia Child
People who love to eat are always the best people. Julia Child

I spotted these funny pictures and quotes on some windows in the Horton Plaza shopping mall food court, in downtown San Diego. I’m not sure if this particular eatery closed down or is soon to debut. I saw no sign. But I had a good laugh!

If you are what you eat, then you might as well eat something good. Ratatouille
If you are what you eat, then you might as well eat something good. Ratatouille
Life is grate!
Life is grate!
Bake the world a better place!
Bake the world a better place!
Rock and Roll (some dough).
Rock and Roll (some dough).

Follow this blog for more photos of fun stuff! Join me on Facebook or Twitter.

Quotes on the Martin Luther King Jr. Promenade.

Walking past a plaque which is engraved with one of many important quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.
Walking past a plaque which is engraved with one of many important quotes by Martin Luther King Jr.

I frequently walk along the Martin Luther King Jr. Promenade in downtown San Diego. Whenever I do, I like to randomly read some of the historic MLK quotes that are engraved in plaques along the long pathway. I’ve never counted the number of quotes. There are easily dozens. Every quote on every plaque is important and powerful, and reflects the intelligence, energy, optimism and wisdom of America’s great civil rights leader.

Here are photos taken at different times of a few of Dr. King’s quotes…

Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor. It must be demanded by the oppressed.
Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor. It must be demanded by the oppressed.
The deep rumbling of discontent that we hear today is the thunder of disinherited masses, rising from dungeons of oppression to the bright hills of freedom in one majestic chorus.
The deep rumbling of discontent that we hear today is the thunder of disinherited masses, rising from dungeons of oppression to the bright hills of freedom in one majestic chorus.
Along the way of life, someone must have sense enough and morality enough to cut off the chain of hate. This can only be done by projecting the ethic of love to the center of our lives.
Along the way of life, someone must have sense enough and morality enough to cut off the chain of hate. This can only be done by projecting the ethic of love to the center of our lives.
We have flown the air like birds and swum the sea like fishes, but have yet to learn the simple act of walking the Earth like brothers.
We have flown the air like birds and swum the sea like fishes, but have yet to learn the simple act of walking the Earth like brothers.
Two people walk side-by-side down the Martin Luther King Jr. Promenade in downtown San Diego.
Two people walk side-by-side down the Martin Luther King Jr. Promenade in downtown San Diego.
I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.
I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.
The democratic ideal of freedom and equality will be fulfilled for all--or all human beings will share in the resulting social and spiritual doom...
The democratic ideal of freedom and equality will be fulfilled for all–or all human beings will share in the resulting social and spiritual doom…
The greatest victory of the civil rights period was something internal...We armed ourselves with dignity and self-respect...We straightened our backs up...
The greatest victory of the civil rights period was something internal…We armed ourselves with dignity and self-respect…We straightened our backs up…
The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.
The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.
Any law that uplifts human personality is just, any law that degrades human personality is unjust.
Any law that uplifts human personality is just, any law that degrades human personality is unjust.
Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend.
Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend.
Breaking the Chains sculpture, by Melvin Edwards, reminds people on MLK Promenade of the positive legacy of a great civil rights leader.
Breaking the Chains sculpture, by Melvin Edwards, reminds people on MLK Promenade of the positive legacy of a great civil rights leader.

To enjoy future posts, you can “like” Cool San Diego Sights on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

Students interview veterans for USS Midway exhibit.

Visitor to USS Midway Museum on Memorial Day weekend absorbs Portraits of Resilience exhibit, created by students of High Tech High Charter School.
Visitor to USS Midway Museum on Memorial Day weekend absorbs Portraits of Resilience exhibit, created by students of High Tech High Charter School.

This morning I walked a little around the USS Midway. The historic aircraft carrier is now a popular museum docked on San Diego Bay. I was there because it’s Memorial Day weekend, and I have personal experiences that make me grateful for America and our brave servicepeople. But I won’t blog about that here.

I was surprised to see a thought-provoking exhibit being set up in the hangar deck of the Midway. I learned it was a project of students at High Tech High, which is a charter school in Point Loma. 50 students interviewed 50 veterans, to learn about war, and peace, and human resiliency.

I took some photos in less-than-optimal lighting, and my flash wasn’t entirely helpful, so I had to apply a good deal of contrast.

Portraits of Resilience. 50 students. 50 veterans. 50 powerful portraits.
Portraits of Resilience. 50 students. 50 veterans. 50 powerful portraits.
The whole point of the Armed Forces is to protect freedoms so that people can agree or disagree with what's going on.
The whole point of the Armed Forces is to protect freedoms so that people can agree or disagree with what’s going on.
Greatness isn't achieved randomly. You need to set goals.
Greatness isn’t achieved randomly. You need to set goals.
It's people. It was always people. I didn't want to let anyone down.
It’s people. It was always people. I didn’t want to let anyone down.
A veteran reads words of memory and wisdom spoken by others who've served in the military.
A veteran reads words of pain, joy, memory and wisdom spoken by others who’ve served in the military.
Everything is written in pencil. As soon as you have a plan, thirty minutes later it changes.
Everything is written in pencil. As soon as you have a plan, thirty minutes later it changes.
Don't waste your time worrying, worrying, worrying! You're only going to get wrinkles!
Don’t waste your time worrying, worrying, worrying! You’re only going to get wrinkles!
My best decision was marrying my wife. My number two was being a pilot and getting my wings.
My best decision was marrying my wife. My number two was being a pilot and getting my wings.
No matter how your grades are what people thank about you, do what you want to do and you can accomplish it.
No matter how your grades are or what people think about you, do what you want to do and you can accomplish it.
We didn't have names of battles. We had excursions, and we had firefights, but we didn't have names of them.
We didn’t have names of battles. We had excursions, and we had firefights, but we didn’t have names of them.
When you return, things are physically and emotionally different. It's like moving from one world to another.
When you return, things are physically and emotionally different. It’s like moving from one world to another.
They had tears of joy, they couldn't believe that someone had documented what they had done; they were proud, they were happy.
They had tears of joy, they couldn’t believe that someone had documented what they had done; they were proud, they were happy.
You're watching his back, he's watching your back.
You’re watching his back, he’s watching your back.
Now when somebody says,
Now when somebody says, “Thank you for your service”, I look them directly in the eye and say, “It was my privilege”.

To enjoy future posts, you can “like” Cool San Diego Sights on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

Balloons, wings, stars and the wisdom of Seuss.

Panda with star on belly is lifted by colorful balloons, and floats away into the blue sky.
Panda with star on belly is lifted by colorful balloons, and floats away into the blue sky.

No matter how different people might appear, we all live among the same bright stars.

Perhaps that’s a bit of wisdom inferred from a book by one of my favorite authors, Dr. Seuss.

That also seems to be the elevating message of this cool street art in Bankers Hill.

While words and art might eventually fade (as these photos prove), the stars buried within us do not.

These three transformer boxes in Bankers Hill are painted with unbounded imagination.
These three transformer boxes in Bankers Hill are painted with unbounded imagination.
Jazzy guy plays keyboard in a boat that soars above the surf and a star-bellied bird.
Jazzy guy plays keyboard in a boat that soars above the surf and a star-bellied bird.
Flowers in hair, on shoulders. A golden star joins the sun and sunflower in symbolic street art.
Flowers in hair, on shoulders. A golden star on a dress joins the sun and sunflower in symbolic street art.
Part of faded Dr. Seuss verse. That day, all the Sneetches forgot about stars and whether they had one, or not, upon thars.
Part of slowly fading Dr. Seuss verse: “That day, all the Sneetches forgot about stars and whether they had one, or not, upon thars.”
Winged angel dog in heaven plays a drum.
Winged angel dog in heaven plays a drum.
Silly green-headed alien frolics on red planet.
Happy, unique green alien frolics on red planet.
Musician in cool sunglasses plays guitar where he stands in the cosmos.
Musician plays his guitar where he stands in the cosmos.
A zany peek over Mars, under stars.
A zany peek over Mars, under stars.

To enjoy future posts, you can “like” Cool San Diego Sights on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.