Fascination, reflection, and a Recovered Stream.

I was getting ready to board a trolley this evening at America Plaza when activity in a window caught my eye.

A person inside the nearby Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego gallery was working above a small planet amid water-like artwork!

The title of the coming exhibition is Oscar Romo: Recovered Stream. According to the museum website: This fall and winter MCASD will present multiple talks by distinguished scientists who will share their knowledge about climate change in conjunction with the participatory exhibition Oscar Romo: Recovered Stream.

With some searching on the internet, I learned environmentalist Oscar Romo is a professor at UC San Diego. His area of expertise is coastal and marine ecosystem conservation, using a natural systems design perspective. He has a special interest in the San Diego-Tijuana border region.

The upcoming talks should be very interesting!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Photos of Donal Hord’s sculpture Spring Stirring.

During my walk through the Scripps Institute of Oceanography on Saturday, I paused in the grassy area just north of the Judith and Walter Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics Munk Laboratory to admire an amazing sculpture by Donal Hord.

Spring Stirring, 1947-1948, was carved from black diorite and stands 46 inches tall. It was exhibited in 1949 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s Third Sculpture International. In 1964, Spring Stirring was given to the University of California’s Scripps Institute of Oceanography by Cecil and Ida Green.

Donal Hord, who achieved worldwide fame for his fine sculptures, developed a deep love for San Diego. He lived most of his life here. Today some of his most important pieces endure as public art around San Diego.

To see the sculpture for yourself (and some fantastic coastal scenery in La Jolla) follow in my footsteps and take a short walk here.

You can find many photographs of Donal Hord’s public sculptures and reliefs by putting his name in the search box on this blog.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

Amazing walk at Scripps Institution of Oceanography!

Scripps Coastal Meander Trailhead at La Jolla Shores Drive, just north of Biological Grade. A sign indicates Coastal Trail Access.
Scripps Coastal Meander Trailhead at La Jolla Shores Drive, just north of Biological Grade. A sign indicates Coastal Trail Access.

Please join me for a short but absolutely amazing walk.

We’re going to start at the Scripps Coastal Meander Trailhead on La Jolla Shores Drive and pass through part of the world-famous Scripps Institution of Oceanography. We’ll enjoy breathtaking views of the Pacific Ocean and nearby coast. We’ll pause at a spot of historical importance. We’ll encounter some beautiful artwork.

Let’s go!

The Scripps Coastal Meander coincides with a short segment of the California Coastal Trail.
The Scripps Coastal Meander coincides with a short segment of the California Coastal Trail.
Starting down the trail.
Starting down the trail.
Moving through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography campus. Someone reads a sign ahead.
Moving through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography campus. Someone reads a sign ahead.
Starting along a raised wooden walkway with amazing views of the Pacific Ocean.
Starting along a raised wooden walkway with amazing views of the Pacific Ocean.
Sign describes the Scripps Coastal Meander, a publicly accessible walking route through the Scripps campus. It is part of the California Coastal Trail.
Sign describes the Scripps Coastal Meander, a publicly accessible walking route through the Scripps campus. It is part of the California Coastal Trail.
A map on the sign shows the California Coastal Trail in relation to the beach, the Scripps Coastal Reserve Biodiversity Trail, Scripps Pier and La Jolla Shores.
A map on the sign shows the California Coastal Trail in relation to the beach, the Scripps Coastal Reserve Biodiversity Trail, Scripps Pier and La Jolla Shores.
Heading down the wooden walkway with amazing views of the Pacific Ocean, Scripps Pier, and La Jolla Cove in the distance.
Heading down the wooden walkway with amazing views of the Pacific Ocean, Scripps Pier, and La Jolla Cove in the distance.
A paraglider from the Torrey Pines Gliderport floats in the sky above a campus building.
A paraglider from the Torrey Pines Gliderport floats in the sky above a campus building.
Soaring high above the beautiful coast.
Soaring high above the beautiful coast.
Looking down from the trail at native flora atop the cliffs above the beach. Dike Rock can be seen jutting through the breaking surf.
Looking down from the trail at native flora atop the cliffs above the beach. Dike Rock can be seen jutting through the breaking surf.
Walking along on a beautiful, sunny San Diego day.
Walking along on a beautiful, sunny San Diego day.
A bench waits ahead.
A bench waits ahead.
Bench overlooks the wide blue ocean.
Bench overlooks the wide blue ocean.
Opa's Bench is dedicated to Arnold Krause. His journey began in Germany and ended in San Diego.
Opa’s Bench is dedicated to Arnold Krause. His journey began in Germany and ended in San Diego.
Two small birds on a rope.
Two small birds on a rope.
Continuing on, I passed a student who attends world renowned Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
Continuing on, I passed a student who attends world renowned Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
Another sign ahead.
Another sign ahead.
Conserving California's Coastal Treasures. Sign describes Marine Protected Areas. Just offshore is the San Diego-Scripps Coastal SMCA.
Conserving California’s Coastal Treasures. Sign describes Marine Protected Areas. Just offshore is the San Diego-Scripps Coastal SMCA.
Continuing down the path, I see something interesting to the right.
Continuing down the path, I see something interesting to the right.
A marker stands at the oldest known archaeological site in Southern California, occupied by the La Jollan I Indians almost 8000 years ago.
A marker stands at what was the oldest known archaeological site in Southern California–radiocarbon dated in 1962–occupied by the La Jollan I Indians almost 8000 years ago.
Approaching a small grassy park with a sculpture.
Approaching a small grassy park with a sculpture.
The sculpture is Spring Stirring by world famous sculptor Donal Hord, 1948, a gift of Cecil and Ida Green in 1964.
The sculpture is Spring Stirring by world famous sculptor Donal Hord, 1948, a gift of Cecil and Ida Green in 1964.
Spring Stirring, by artist Donal Hord.
Spring Stirring, by artist Donal Hord.
Starting along a narrow walkway around the perimeter of the Judith and Walter Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics Munk Laboratory.
Starting along a narrow walkway around the perimeter of the Judith and Walter Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics Munk Laboratory.
Looking north up the coast toward Black's Beach and Torrey Pines State Reserve.
Looking north up the coast toward Black’s Beach and Torrey Pines State Reserve.
Looking southwest at Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier, which is used for ocean research by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
Looking southwest at Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier, which is used for ocean research by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
Beyond Scripps Pier and Scripps Beach is La Jolla Shores and the Village of La Jolla.
Beyond Scripps Pier and Scripps Beach is La Jolla Shores and the Village of La Jolla.

This blog now features thousands of photos around San Diego! Are you curious? There’s lots of cool stuff to check out!

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Walking up the Snake Path at UCSD.

If you dare, walk with me up the Snake Path at UCSD. We will proceed from innocence to knowledge.

We’ll begin at a spot near the Jacobs School of Engineering, then head west up a hill toward the amazing Geisel Library. Our path is the winding 560-foot length of a scaly snake.

Snake Path, part of the UC San Diego Stuart Collection, was created by Alexis Smith in 1992. The scales of the snake are hexagonal pieces of colored slate.

We’ll pass a monumental granite book, none other than Milton’s Paradise Lost. On the cover is engraved: “And wilt thou not be loathe to leave this Paradise, but shalt possess a Paradise within thee, happier far.”

We’ll linger at a bench in a small Garden of Eden. Written on the bench are Thomas Gray’s words: “Yet ah why should they know their fate/When sorrow never comes too late/And happiness too swiftly flies/Thought would destroy their Paradise/No more, where ignorance is bliss, tis folly to be wise.”

Toward innocence or knowledge. Which direction is best?

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

A 180 ton teddy bear made of boulders!

Here come a few astonishing photos!

Eight enormous boulders form a jaw-dropping 180 ton teddy bear in the Academic Courtyard at UC San Diego. It might look cute and cuddly, but try wrapping your arms around this public art!

Bear, part of UCSD’s fantastic Stuart Collection of art, was created by Tim Hawkinson in 2005. The immense stone sculpture seems to defy gravity as it sits limply on a patch of green grass between three buildings where engineering and technology are taught.

What is the good of science without imagination?

Perhaps an infant troll one day will stride onto campus to retrieve their lost toy. Or perhaps in the distant future, among the ruins of ancient buildings, perplexed scientists will discover Bear and conclude that a race of giants once inhabited our planet.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

Dr. Seuss and Cat in the Hat sculpture at UCSD.

Dr. Seuss and the Cat in the Hat are cast in bronze at UC San Diego in La Jolla, not far from the place where the famous children's author resided much of his life.
Dr. Seuss and The Cat in the Hat are cast in bronze at UC San Diego in La Jolla, not far from the place where the famous children’s author resided much of his life.

In 2004, the 100th anniversary of the birth of Dr. Seuss, the Theodor Seuss Geisel Memorial made its debut outside the Geisel Library at UC San Diego. The famous children’s book author and illustrator spent the second half of his life living in La Jolla, in a home not far from the university. The University of California San Diego’s main library, the Geisel Library, is now home of the Dr. Seuss Collection.

The inspiring sculpture on the plaza outside the library is by Lark Grey Dimond-Cates. The Cat in the Hat stands at Dr. Seuss’ shoulder holding an umbrella.

The original casting of this whimsical sculpture and many others like it can also be found at the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden at the Springfield Museums’ Quadrangle in Springfield, Massachusetts, the birthplace of Theodor Seuss Geisel.

Plaque describes the Theodor Seuss Geisel Memorial at UC San Diego, home of the Dr. Seuss Collection. The memorial, by sculptor Lark Grey Dimond-Cates, was dedicated on 2 March 2004.
Plaque describes the Theodor Seuss Geisel Memorial at UC San Diego, home of the Dr. Seuss Collection. The memorial, by sculptor Lark Grey Dimond-Cates, was dedicated on 2 March 2004.
The Theodor Seuss Geisel Memorial stands on the outdoor Forum Level of the Geisel Library at UCSD.
The Theodor Seuss Geisel Memorial stands on the outdoor Forum Level of the Geisel Library at UCSD.
A bronze Cat in the Hat stands at the shoulder of Dr. Seuss.
A tall bronze The Cat in the Hat stands with an umbrella at the shoulder of Dr. Seuss.
Dr. Seuss relaxes for a bit with a foot up on his work table.
Dr. Seuss relaxes and reflects for a moment with a foot up on his work table.
A thoughtful, pleasant moment as a famous children's book author and illustrator takes a break to dream.
A thoughtful, pleasant moment as a famous children’s book author and illustrator takes a break to dream.
Looking over the bronze shoulder of Dr. Seuss on a sunny day in La Jolla.
Looking over the bronze shoulder of Dr. Seuss on a sunny day in La Jolla.
The iconic children's character Cat in the Hat cast in bronze.
An immortal children’s character from The Cat in the Hat cast in bronze.
The friendly, wise face of Theodor Seuss Geisel.
The friendly, wise face of beloved author Theodor Seuss Geisel.
The work table of a world-famous children's author and artist.
The work table of a world-famous children’s author and artist.
The inspiring bronze Theodor Seuss Geisel Memorial can be found outside the southwest corner of the Geisel Library at UC San Diego.
The inspiring bronze Theodor Seuss Geisel Memorial can be found outside the southwest corner of the Geisel Library at UC San Diego.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

Computer Science and a boom box at UCSD!

Father of the Computer, Charles Babbage, 1791-1871.
Father of the Computer, Charles Babbage, 1791-1871.

There are two electrical boxes near the UCSD Gilman Transit Center that caught my eye last weekend. One features tributes to three early pioneers of computer science. The other is painted to appear like a gigantic boom box. Technology and music are central to the life of many students at UC San Diego.

I always love revisiting the campus of UC San Diego. It’s a very beautiful place, bustling with energy. The university is rated one of the finest in the world. When I see the inventors of tomorrow, walking with smiles in the La Jolla sunshine, I feel hopeful.

Enchantress of Numbers, Ada Lovelace, 1815-1852.
Enchantress of Numbers, Ada Lovelace, 1815-1852.
Father of Computer Science, Alan Turing, 1912-1954.
Father of Computer Science, Alan Turing, 1912-1954.
An electrical box painted like a huge boom box near UCSD's Gilman Transit Center.
An electrical box painted like a huge boom box near UCSD’s Gilman Transit Center.
Musical notes stream from an enormous boom box at UC San Diego!
Musical notes stream from an enormous boom box at UC San Diego!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!