Art on construction fence at MCASD La Jolla.

Images from the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego on a construction fence at the La Jolla campus.
Images from the permanent collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego decorate a construction fence at their La Jolla campus.

During my walk through La Jolla last weekend, I noticed some graphics on a construction fence in front of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. As I approached the fence, I read signs that provided an explanation.

This cool, temporary Inside-Out Gallery features images of works that are in the museum’s permanent collection. An expansion of the museum’s La Jolla campus is underway. Please read to the photo captions to learn about MCASD’s very bright future!

The Inside-Out Gallery features images from the museum's permanent collection. The La Jolla location is closed for construction. The gallery space is being greatly increased.
The Inside-Out Gallery features images from the museum’s permanent collection. The La Jolla location is closed for new construction. The gallery space is being greatly increased.
Red Blue Green, Ellsworth Kelly, 1963.
Red Blue Green, Ellsworth Kelly, 1963.
An Inner Dialogue with Frida Kahlo (Collar of Thorns), Yasumasa Morimura, 2001.
An Inner Dialogue with Frida Kahlo (Collar of Thorns), Yasumasa Morimura, 2001.
Terms Most Useful in Describing Creative Works of Art, John Baldessari, 1966-1968.
Terms Most Useful in Describing Creative Works of Art, John Baldessari, 1966-1968.
No Splash, Ramiro Gomez, 2013.
No Splash, Ramiro Gomez, 2013.
Bottles, Philip Guston, 1977.
Bottles, Philip Guston, 1977.
Sinjerli 1, Frank Stella, 1967.
Sinjerli 1, Frank Stella, 1967.
Under the Table 2, Nicole Eisenman, 2014.
Under the Table 2, Nicole Eisenman, 2014.
Pool Party, John Valadez, 1986.
Pool Party, John Valadez, 1986.
The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego is expanding its La Jolla campus. The gallery space will be quadrupled from 10,000 to 40,000 square feet.
The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego is expanding its La Jolla campus. The gallery space will be quadrupled from 10,000 to 40,000 square feet.
A rendering shows the future museum after expansion. The design by New York City-based Selldorf Architects will offer dramatic views of the nearby ocean and coast.
A rendering shows the future museum after expansion. The design by New York City-based Selldorf Architects will offer dramatic views of the nearby ocean and coast.
Another rendering depicts a front corner of the museum after expansion.
Another rendering depicts a front corner of the museum after its expansion.
The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego in La Jolla is currently closed due to the construction.
The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego in La Jolla is currently closed due to the construction.
A plaque near the museum's entrance. In Memory of Ellen Browning Scripps. The building was her former La Jolla home.
A plaque near the museum’s entrance is In Memory of Ellen Browning Scripps. The original building whose facade is still visible was designed by famed architect Irving J. Gill and considered one of his masterworks. The building was commissioned by Scripps and became her La Jolla home.
Flowers, Andy Warhol, 1967.
Flowers, Andy Warhol, 1967.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

Visit a world-class map museum in La Jolla!

World Map (Ptolemy), Johann Schnitzer, 1482 or 1486.
World Map (Ptolemy), Johann Schnitzer, 1482 or 1486.

I was surprised to learn recently that a world-class map museum is located in San Diego. The Map and Atlas Museum of La Jolla is considered to be one of the best dedicated map museums in the entire world!

Out of curiosity, I swung by the small museum yesterday and lingered for at least an hour. I could have spent the entire day looking at the amazing collection of historical maps that fill several themed galleries.

Many of the rare maps are antique, dating from centuries ago when the world’s outlines were unknown, and sea monsters inhabited the watery margins. Every map in the collection is original and authentic, including the first map ever printed!

As I stepped through the door I was greeted by Richard, the friendly director of the museum. I learned that this free museum was founded by Michael Stone, a local businessman and collector with a love for maps. In his youth he collected baseball cards, stamps and coins, before maps and cartography became his passion. At any given time, about ten percent of his vast collection is on display. I was told that Michael is one of the top half dozen map collectors in the world.

There are antique maps showing Earth as the center of Creation, maps from the Age of Exploration, maps from the Revolutionary War, Victorian maps, tourist maps, even maps showing early San Diego. There’s a woodcut map that was created by Benjamin Franklin! There are artistic maps, humorous maps, playing card maps, practically every variety of map or atlas ever conceived by the human mind. There are also historical instruments used by the old explorers and map makers.

For history lovers, the Map and Atlas Museum of La Jolla is a jaw-dropping delight! Visitors might feel they’ve stepped into the vaults of the Smithsonian or National Archives. The collection is that extraordinary!

Richard wandered about the museum during my visit, greeting people and providing tidbits of fascinating information. He informed me many students come by the museum, where they can study history, cartography, design and art.

The museum contains such an abundance of cool stuff, I don’t know where to possibly begin. To provide an idea of what you will see, I offer a sampling of photos. I’ve roughly arranged these maps in chronological order. Read the captions!

In my opinion, this little-known attraction in San Diego is an absolute must see! You can find it in the lower courtyard level of the office building at 7825 Fay Avenue in La Jolla. Check out their website for hours and more info, including special exhibitions.

Visitors look at an amazing collection of historic maps at the Map and Atlas Museum of La Jolla.
Visitors look at an amazing collection of historic maps at the Map and Atlas Museum of La Jolla.
I was shown the museum's work room, containing a library containing many books that the public can access. A variety of projects like the scanning of historic documents is also done here.
I was shown the museum’s work room, containing a library of books that the public can access. A variety of museum projects like the scanning of maps and historical documents is also done here.

The following is a tiny sample of the many original, rare maps you’ll see when you visit the museum:

The world's first printed map of a certain date, 1472. This woodcut T-O shaped world map is from Isidorus Hispalensis (Isidore of Seville).
The world’s first printed map of a certain date, 1472. This woodcut T-O shaped world map is from Isidorus Hispalensis (Isidore of Seville).
World Map, anonymous, 1491. This map was often hung in medieval monasteries or palaces. It first appeared in the Rudimentum Novitiorum of 1475.
World Map, anonymous, 1491. This map was often hung in medieval monasteries or palaces. It first appeared in the Rudimentum Novitiorum of 1475.
World Map (Ptolemy), Martin Waldseemuller, 1513. Even after the discovery of America, Ptolemaic maps devoid of a Western Hemisphere were still printed.
World Map (Ptolemy), Martin Waldseemuller, 1513. Even after the discovery of America, Ptolemaic maps devoid of a Western Hemisphere were still printed.
North Atlantic, Jacob Ziegler, 1532. Information for this map was obtained from two Archbishops in Rome. Newfoundland is Terra Bacallaos, or land of codfish.
North Atlantic, Jacob Ziegler, 1532. Information for this map was obtained from two Archbishops in Rome. Newfoundland is Terra Bacallaos, or land of codfish.
America, Sebastian Munster, Basle, 1540. This depiction of North America came from reports by explorer Giovanni da Verrazano.
America, Sebastian Munster, Basle, 1540. This depiction of North America came from reports by explorer Giovanni da Verrazano.
Eastern North America, Girolamo Ruscelli, 1561. Little was known about the inland geography.
Eastern North America, Girolamo Ruscelli, 1561. Little was known about the inland geography.
North America, Paolo Forlani, 1565. A map that shows America and Asia separated with a strait.
North America, Paolo Forlani, 1565. A map that shows America and Asia separated with a strait.
China, Japan and Korea, Jodocus Hondius, 1606. Copperplate engraving from the Mercator Atlas.
China, Japan and Korea, Jodocus Hondius, 1606. Copperplate engraving from the Mercator Atlas.
View of Macao, Theodore de Bry, 1607. A stylized map, the first published image of Macao.
View of Macao, Theodore de Bry, 1607. A stylized map, the first published image of Macao.
The Low Countries in the Form of a Lion, Petrus Kaerius, 1617. A map of the Netherlands and Belgium.
The Low Countries in the Form of a Lion, Petrus Kaerius, 1617. A map of the Netherlands and Belgium.
Northeast North America, Jan Jansson and Nicholas Visscher, 1655.
Northeast North America, Jan Jansson and Nicholas Visscher, 1655.
Second Hemisphere with the Christianized firmament, Andreas Cellarius, 1660. The twelve apostles supplanted the old zodiacal constellations in this map.
Second Hemisphere with the Christianized firmament, Andreas Cellarius, 1660. The twelve apostles supplanted the old zodiacal constellations in this map.
The Sizes of the Celestial Bodies, Andreas Cellarius, 1660. The heavenly bodies compared with Earth, according to Ptolemy.
The Sizes of the Celestial Bodies, Andreas Cellarius, 1660. The heavenly bodies compared with Earth, according to Ptolemy.
English colonies, Richard Daniel, ca. 1679. The first printed map of the colonies depicting roads.
English colonies, Richard Daniel, ca. 1679. The first printed map of the colonies depicting roads.
California on early maps was depicted as an island.
California on early maps was depicted as an island.
Southern and Southeast Asia, Frederick de Wit, ca. 1680. A standard Dutch published map.
Southern and Southeast Asia, Frederick de Wit, ca. 1680. A standard Dutch published map.
Eastern North America, Hermann Moll, 1715. Beautiful illustration on what is commonly called the beaver map, which was copied from an earlier 1698 map by Nicolas de Fer.
Eastern North America, Hermann Moll, 1715. Beautiful illustration on what is commonly called the beaver map, which was copied from an earlier 1698 map by Nicolas de Fer.
Nova Orbis Terraquei Tabula Accuratissime Delineata, Pieter Van Der Aa, 1713. I love the extensive Latin name given to this highly ornate copper-plate engraving Dutch map!
Nova Orbis Terraquei Tabula Accuratissime Delineata, Pieter Van Der Aa, 1713. I love the extensive Latin name given to this highly ornate copper-plate engraving Dutch map!
A display case at the Map and Atlas Museum of La Jolla includes geographic playing cards from the early 18th century.
A display case at the Map and Atlas Museum of La Jolla includes geographic playing cards from the early 18th century.
Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, Benjamin Franklin, 1733. Franklin likely cut the woodblock himself. The map shows the newly delineated boundaries of Maryland and Pennsylvania.
Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, Benjamin Franklin, 1733. Franklin likely cut the woodblock himself. The map shows the newly delineated boundaries of Maryland and Pennsylvania.
Battle of Long Island, Samuel Holland, 1776. A section of a map that shows the plan of the first major battle in the American Revolution.
Battle of Long Island, Samuel Holland, 1776. A section of a map that shows the plan of the first major battle in the American Revolution.
New Jersey and Pennsylvania, William Faden, 1777. Plan of the Operations of General Washington, against the King's Troops in New Jersey.
New Jersey and Pennsylvania, William Faden, 1777. Plan of the Operations of General Washington, against the King’s Troops in New Jersey.
Philadelphia, William Faden, 1777. Lower half of the map includes copy of the earliest known printed image of Independence Hall.
Philadelphia, William Faden, 1777. Lower half of the map includes copy of the earliest known printed image of Independence Hall.
The Wonderground Map of London Town, MacDonald Gill, 1915. This small section shows some of the delightful retail map's humor.
The Wonderground Map of London Town, MacDonald Gill, 1915. This small section shows some of the delightful retail map’s humor.
Mission Beach, San Diego, 1915. Map of the projected development of Mission Beach.
Mission Beach, San Diego, 1915. Map of the projected development of Mission Beach.
San Diego, Joseph Jacinto Mora, 1928. Corner of a map containing historic illustrations and important places, like the pictured Union Station (now Santa Fe Depot), Horton House (where the U.S. Grant Hotel stands today), Army and Navy YMCA, and Casa de Estudillo in Old Town, which was then called Ramona's Marriage Place.
San Diego, Joseph Jacinto Mora, 1928. Corner of a map containing illustrations of local history and important places, like the pictured Union Station (now Santa Fe Depot), Horton House (where the U.S. Grant Hotel stands today), Army and Navy YMCA, and Casa de Estudillo in Old Town, which was then called Ramona’s Marriage Place.
Another section of the same map showing areas around San Diego Bay including downtown, National CIty, Coronado and Point Loma.
Another section of the same map showing areas around San Diego Bay including downtown, National City, Coronado and Point Loma.
A Map of Ceylon showing her Tea and Other Industries, MacDonald Gill, ca. 1934.
A Map of Ceylon showing her Tea and Other Industries, MacDonald Gill, ca. 1934.
Mail Steamship Routes, MacDonald Gill, 1937.
Mail Steamship Routes, MacDonald Gill, 1937.
The Time and Tide Map of the United Nations, MacDonald Gill, 1948.
The Time and Tide Map of the United Nations, MacDonald Gill, 1948.
Southern California, Roads To Romance, a tourist map ca. 1958.
Southern California, Roads To Romance, a tourist map ca. 1958.
Thomas Jeffery's brass theodolite, part of the museum's collection. Jeffery was geographer to King George III. The antique theodolite is pictured in the book The Cartographical Collection of Michael R. Stone.
Thomas Jefferys’ brass theodolite, part of the museum’s collection. Jefferys was geographer to King George III. The antique theodolite is pictured in the extraordinary book The Cartographical Collection of Michael R. Stone.
The Location of the Earth, Encircled by the Celestial Circles, Andreas Cellarius, 1660.
The Location of the Earth, Encircled by the Celestial Circles, Andreas Cellarius, 1660.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

More cool art found walking around La Jolla!

Expecting to Fly (for the Zeros), Fred Tomaselli, 2013.
Expecting to Fly (for the Zeros), Fred Tomaselli, 2013.

You might remember I posted photos of street art and many of the Murals of La Jolla a couple years ago. You can see all of that fun artwork by clicking here. Sadly, a couple of those murals no longer exist.

My adventure today included passing by even more public art murals, plus some beautiful and inspirational stuff that I found while journeying down sidewalks.

I snapped a great map and legend of the Murals of La Jolla in front of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego on Prospect Street, which is undergoing a renovation. To see the location of all the current murals, which include some that I photographed in that earlier blog post, click the map below and it will enlarge.

Map and legend that you can use to locate the many amazing Murals of La Jolla.
Map and legend that you can use to locate the many amazing Murals of La Jolla.
Playing La Jolla (for all it's worth), Terry Allen, 2015.
Playing La Jolla (for all it’s worth), Terry Allen, 2015.
Suns, Victoria Fu and Byron Kim, 2016.
Suns, Victoria Fu and Byron Kim, 2016.
Man, Myth and Magic, Steven Hull, 2017.
Man, Myth and Magic, Steven Hull, 2017.
Art near entrance of Le Chauvinist depicts three kids at the Lincoln Memorial.
Art near entrance of Le Chauvinist depicts three kids at the Lincoln Memorial.
A fish etched in the concrete sidewalk near El Pescador Fish Market!
A fish etched in the concrete sidewalk near El Pescador Fish Market!
Angel wings on a gate.
Angel wings on a gate.
One of the most stunning gates I've ever seen. Golden leaves and blooms seem to grow through it.
One of the most stunning gates I’ve ever seen. Shining golden leaves and blooms seem to grow through it.
By the sidewalk. Joan Goldstein Graf and Alan Goldstein. Their bench.
By the sidewalk… Joan Goldstein Graf and Alan Goldstein. Their bench.
Painted flowers near the roof of Salvage Salon.
Painted flowers near the roof of Salvage Salon.
Come into my garden so my flowers can meet you.
Come into my garden so my flowers can meet you.
A very cool mural in the alley next to the Grater grilled cheese shop in La Jolla.
A very cool mural in the alley next to the Grater grilled cheese shop in La Jolla.
It appears Mona Lisa has a taste for grilled cheese sandwiches!
It appears Mona Lisa has a taste for grilled cheese sandwiches!

This blog now features thousands of photos around San Diego! Are you curious? There’s lots of cool stuff to check out!

Here’s the Cool San Diego Sights main page, where you can read the most current blog posts.  If you’re using a phone or small mobile device, click those three parallel lines up at the top–that opens up my website’s sidebar, where you’ll see the most popular posts, a search box, and more!

To enjoy future posts, you can also “like” Cool San Diego Sights on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

A beach walk to La Jolla Shores tide pools.

Beachgoers have left some flip-flops and shoes at the west end of Avenida de la Playa. Sand feels good under bare toes.
Beachgoers have left some flip-flops and shoes at the west end of Avenida de la Playa. Sand feels good under bare toes.

Here’s a series of photos from my walk down the beach at La Jolla Shores. I began at the west end of Avenida de la Playa and headed south along the sand to the tide pools.

Come along and let’s enjoy another beautiful day!

Looking north along the beach at La Jolla Shores on a winter Saturday. I see part of the famous Scripps Institution of Oceanography up on the hillside.
Looking north along the beach at La Jolla Shores on a winter Saturday. I see part of the famous Scripps Institution of Oceanography up on the hillside.
A group of kayakers receives instruction before heading out onto the Pacific Ocean.
A group of kayakers receives instruction before heading out onto the Pacific Ocean.
People enter the Pacific Ocean with colorful kayaks and paddles.
People enter the Pacific Ocean with colorful kayaks and paddles.
Running along the beach at La Jolla Shores. To the north one can see Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier, and beyond the high sandstone cliffs of Black's Beach.
Running along the beach at La Jolla Shores. To the north one can see Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier, and beyond the high sandstone cliffs of Black’s Beach.
A friendly San Diego lifeguard driving past waves hello!
A friendly San Diego lifeguard driving past waves hello!
A man carries his kayak across the sand toward the water. It's an overcast winter day, but very pleasant.
A man carries his kayak across the sand toward the water. It’s an overcast winter day, but very pleasant.
Two people walking south along the smooth beach. La Jolla Cove can be seen across La Jolla Bay.
Two people walking south along the smooth beach. La Jolla Cove can be seen across La Jolla Bay.
Now we are walking south along the shore past the sprawling La Jolla Beach and Tennis Club resort.
Now we are walking south along the shore past the sprawling La Jolla Beach and Tennis Club resort. Some people are sitting under umbrellas enjoying the weekend.
The Marine Room is on the left. At high tide, crashing waves come right up to the windows of this elegant restaurant with a stunning ocean view.
I see The Marine Room on the left. At high tide, crashing waves come right up to the windows of this elegant restaurant with a stunning ocean view.
A palatial, almost 16,000-square-foot estate overlooking the beach in La Jolla, called Villa Pelagia. Locals call it the Sand Castle Mansion. The property built in 1929 once looked quite different.
A palatial, almost 16,000-square-foot estate named Villa Pelagia overlooks the beach in La Jolla. Locals call it the Sand Castle Mansion. The property, built in 1929, once looked quite different.
Now we are approaching some tide pools at the south end of the La Jolla Shores beach.
Now we are approaching some tide pools at the south end of the La Jolla Shores beach.
People (and a gull) carefully walk among slippery rocks searching for tiny sea creatures.
People (and a gull) carefully walk among slippery rocks searching for tiny sea creatures.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

A walk to the beach down Avenida de la Playa.

A bit of Wordsworth poetry and a flower etched into concrete. One of many cool sights during a walk down Avenida de la Playa.
A bit of Wordsworth poetry and a flower etched into concrete. One of many cool sights during a walk down Avenida de la Playa.

Last weekend I went for a short walk through another beautiful part of La Jolla. I headed from La Jolla Shores Drive down Avenida de la Playa all the way to the beach. (Then I turned south and walked slowly over the sand to the tide pools. I’ll post photos of my beach walk later.)

Let’s head west down the street and enjoy a few cool sights!

A funny sign on the sidewalk near Cooper's Market and Cafe. Look Morty, they have carbs and caffeine!
A funny sign on the sidewalk near Cooper’s Market and Cafe. Look Morty, they have carbs and caffeine!
Art on wall of Everyday California Adventures and Apparel shows a bear carrying a surfboard.
Art on wall of Everyday California Adventures and Apparel shows a bear carrying a surfboard.
Mural on west side of Galaxy Taco includes images of colorful Mexican papel picado.
Painted artwork on west side of Galaxy Taco includes colorful, strung Mexican papel picado. One of the Murals of La Jolla. Demos Gracias, Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia, 2016. 
Galaxy Taco's colorful mailbox with their menu.
Galaxy Taco’s colorful mailbox with their menu.
Surf's up. One of many underfoot messages in panels of concrete near the corner of Avenida de la Playa and Paseo del Ocaso.
Surf’s up. One of many underfoot messages in panels of concrete near the corner of Avenida de la Playa and Paseo del Ocaso.
Someone has rented a stand up paddleboard at La Jolla Kayak. It's a short distance to the beach from here.
Someone has rented a stand up paddleboard at La Jolla Kayak. It’s a short distance to the beach from here.
Looking west down Avenida de la Playa during a pleasant Saturday walk in laid-back La Jolla Shores.
Looking west down Avenida de la Playa during a pleasant Saturday walk in laid-back La Jolla Shores.
Barbarella Restaurant and Bar has a huge wing corkscrew sculpture with human feet!
Barbarella Restaurant and Bar has a huge wing corkscrew sculpture with human feet!
I'm not tired yet, but here's a cool bench with seahorses and shells.
I’m not tired yet, but here’s a cool bench with seahorses and shells.
Carrying paddleboards west toward the nearby beach. Kayaking in the Pacific Ocean off La Jolla is also very popular.
Carrying paddleboards west toward the nearby beach. Kayaking in the Pacific Ocean off La Jolla is also very popular.
An Ocean Girl with heart.
Ocean Girl with heart.
Build your own ice cream sandwich. Very tempting!
Build your own ice cream sandwich. Very tempting!
After a short, fun walk, we've reached the beach!
After a short, fun walk, we’ve reached the beach!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Computer Science and a boom box at UCSD!

Father of the Computer, Charles Babbage, 1791-1871.
Father of the Computer, Charles Babbage, 1791-1871.

There are two electrical boxes near the UCSD Gilman Transit Center that caught my eye last weekend. One features tributes to three early pioneers of computer science. The other is painted to appear like a gigantic boom box. Technology and music are central to the life of many students at UC San Diego.

I always love revisiting the campus of UC San Diego. It’s a very beautiful place, bustling with energy. The university is rated one of the finest in the world. When I see the inventors of tomorrow, walking with smiles in the La Jolla sunshine, I feel hopeful.

Enchantress of Numbers, Ada Lovelace, 1815-1852.
Enchantress of Numbers, Ada Lovelace, 1815-1852.
Father of Computer Science, Alan Turing, 1912-1954.
Father of Computer Science, Alan Turing, 1912-1954.
An electrical box painted like a huge boom box near UCSD's Gilman Transit Center.
An electrical box painted like a huge boom box near UCSD’s Gilman Transit Center.
Musical notes stream from an enormous boom box at UC San Diego!
Musical notes stream from an enormous boom box at UC San Diego!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Salk Institute architect Louis Kahn: an amazing exhibit!

Photo of exterior of The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla. The famous building was designed by renowned modernist architect Louis Kahn.
Photo of exterior of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla. The famous building was designed by renowned modernist architect Louis Kahn.

One of the world’s most famous works of modern architecture is located in San Diego.  I’m referring to the Salk Institute building in La Jolla. Its designer was Louis Kahn, considered to have been one of the most important, innovative architects of the 20th century.

An exhibition now running at the San Diego Museum of Art takes a thorough look at the remarkable life, work and genius of Louis Kahn.

Last weekend I was given a personal tour of the amazing exhibit and found myself completely blown away by its scope. The photos, films, sketches, notes and architectural models, including a life-size portion of an extraordinary house–even works of art produced by Louis Kahn himself– were too much for my mind to absorb in one visit.

Kahn was undoubtedly a genius. His unique modern structures seem like ancient timeless monuments, made beautifully functional. They are simultaneously complex and simple. They are geometric, symmetric, modular, clean. They seem solid but light-filled. They contain unusual surprises of line, curve and angle. They are iconic.

Louis Kahn had a long, prolific career.  His work can be found throughout the world, and includes the enormous, citadel-like National Assembly Building of Bangladesh. Some of his more famous creations in the United States include the Kimball Art Museum, the Yale University Art Gallery, the library at Philips Exeter Academy, the Norman Fisher House in Philadelphia, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, and, of course, San Diego’s own remarkable Salk Institute.

There is so much to see in this impressive exhibit–there were so many amazing designs produced by Kahn during his productive lifetime–that I can’t begin to cover it all in this blog. So I must direct you to the San Diego Museum of Art’s website. To get a small hint of what you will discover at the museum, you might want to check out the Wikipedia article on Louis Kahn.

This weekend I headed up to La Jolla to see if I could snap some good photos of Louis Kahn’s very famous Salk Institute building. Walking around, I managed to photograph the exterior, but I was unable to access the interior courtyard. So I’ve included one photo from Wikimedia Commons, just to provide a quick idea. Peering through a fence, I did glimpse some scaffolding in the interior area, so I suppose that would have nullified my photographic attempts, anyway.

The Salk Institute building’s walls are made of smooth exposed concrete. While this material might appear stark, the monumental appearance, the intriguing shapes and architectural symmetry are absolutely impressive. There is a mathematical, complex interaction between shadow and light that is difficult to describe–and quite beautiful.

Want to see more of Kahn’s brilliant work? Head over to the San Diego Museum of Art in Balboa Park before this special exhibition closes on January 31, 2017.

Louis Kahn The Power of Architecture is a special exhibit showing at the San Diego Museum of Art in Balboa Park through January 31, 2017.
Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture is a special exhibit showing at the San Diego Museum of Art in Balboa Park through January 31, 2017.
Salk Institute in La Jolla from the interior courtyard. (A cropped public domain photo from Wikimedia Commons.)
Salk Institute in La Jolla from the interior courtyard. (A cropped public domain photo from Wikimedia Commons.)
Interior section of the Salk Institute just beyond the main entrance.
Interior section of the Salk Institute just beyond the main entrance.
Kahn's design seems both simple and futuristic. The interior space utilized by medical research scientists is said to be uniquely inspiring and functional.
Kahn’s design seems both simple and futuristic. The interior space utilized by medical research scientists is said to be intellectually inspiring and uniquely functional.
Another photo of the Salk Institute building's fascinating exterior.
Another photo of the Salk Institute building’s fascinating exterior.
A monumental building made of smooth exposed concrete with simple, clean lines, between green grass and blue San Diego sky.
A monumental building made of smooth exposed concrete with simple, clean lines, between green grass and blue San Diego sky.
A small but interesting portion of the Salk Institute building.
A small but interesting portion of the Salk Institute building.
The surface of the Salk Institute building is stark but surprisingly beautiful. Time has made the concrete appear more earthen and natural. Almost like marble.
The surface of the Salk Institute building is stark but surprisingly beautiful. Time has made the concrete appear more earthen and natural. Almost like marble.
Laboratory visible through one window. Jonas Salk invented the polio vaccine. Salk Institute today is a world leader in medical research.
Laboratory visible through one window. Jonas Salk invented the polio vaccine. Salk Institute today is a world leader in medical research.
It's a sunny day in La Jolla as someone walks toward a brilliant creation of the human mind--a building designed by famed modernist architect Louis Kahn.
It’s a sunny day in La Jolla as someone walks toward a brilliant creation of the human mind: a building designed by famed modernist architect Louis Kahn.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of interesting photos for you to enjoy!