The Gifted trolley wrap for 2017 Comic-Con!

New trolley wrap for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con promotes The Gifted, an upcoming Marvel series on FOX.
New trolley wrap for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con promotes The Gifted, an upcoming Marvel series on FOX.

I spotted a third new trolley wrap for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con! This cool wrap promotes the upcoming FOX series The Gifted, which will concern Marvel’s universe of mutant X-Men. Looks like the Sentinel Services mutant transport will be filled with gifted Comic-Con attendees this year! Hopefully it transports them to the convention center, and not somewhere less pleasant!

I spoke to an MTS supervisor at America Plaza and he believes there will be one more wrap this year!

The Gifted will be based on Marvel's popular X-Men characters.
The Gifted will be based on Marvel’s popular X-Men characters.
During San Diego Comic-Con, lots of mutants will be transported on this Sentinel Services vehicle. I wonder if it's made of plastic, in case Magneto comes along!
During San Diego Comic-Con, lots of mutants will be transported on this Sentinel Services vehicle. I wonder if it’s made of plastic in case Magneto comes along!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of fun photos for you to share and enjoy!

A new Conan O’Brien trolley wrap for 2017 SDCC!

Conan O'Brien is returning to San Diego Comic-Con in 2017. Trolleys are wrapped with images of Conan as four different Funko Pop! toys.
Conan O’Brien is returning to San Diego Comic-Con in 2017. Some trolleys are wrapped with images of Conan as four different Funko Pop! toys.

Here are some photos of the new Conan O’Brien trolley wrap for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con! I spied two trolley cars with this wrap on my way home from work aboard the Green Line.

This is the third year in a row Conan will be hosting his funny TBS talk show at the Spreckels Theatre during Comic-Con. And, as before, the trolley wraps feature him transformed into four different Funko Pop! characters.

This year Conan appears as Justice League member the Flash, as a Game of Thrones White Walker, as Marvel’s ever-popular superhero Spiderman, and finally as a Star Wars Jedi holding a lightsaber.

Enjoy these photos! I’ll keep watching for new SDCC trolley wraps in the days ahead!

For the third year in a row, TBS television talk show host Conan O'Brien is transformed by Funko into famous pop culture characters.
For the third year in a row, TBS television talk show host Conan O’Brien has been transformed by Funko into four famous pop culture characters.
Conan O'Brien has become the fastest man alive--The Flash!
Conan O’Brien has become the fastest man alive–The Flash!
This trolley wrap image has Conan turned into a White Walker from Game of Thrones.
This trolley wrap image has Conan turned into a White Walker from Game of Thrones.
Conan is hanging upside down from the roof of the trolley. He is your friendly neighborhood Spiderman!
Conan is hanging upside down from the roof of the trolley. He is your friendly neighborhood Spiderman!
Or perhaps Conan is actually a Star Wars Jedi!
Or perhaps Conan is actually a Star Wars Jedi. Is he a Gray Jedi?
San Diego Comic-Con is on the way, and lots of trolleys are appearing with a variety of cool wraps!
San Diego Comic-Con is on the way, and lots of trolleys are appearing with a variety of cool wraps!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands of photos (including a bunch from past Comic-Cons) for you to share and enjoy!

First 2017 San Diego Comic-Con trolley wrap: Orville!

The very first trolley wrap for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con has appeared! It's Orville, a new funny science fiction show coming to FOX!
The very first trolley wrap for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con has appeared! The Orville is a funny new science fiction show coming to FOX!

The very first trolley wrap for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con has appeared! Here are a bunch of photos!

Characters from the upcoming FOX television show The Orville appear on this cool wrap. The humorous science fiction series is created by and stars Seth MacFarlane, so chances are it’s going to be really good.

I spoke to various people who work for MTS–a couple of trolley drivers and others–and learned the wraps are being applied to many cars right now. I can’t wait to see what else materializes!

I’m going to blog about downtown San Diego during Comic-Con like crazy this year. So follow along if you’d like! It should be a lot of fun!

400 years in the future, technology has changed. Relationships? Not so much.
400 years in the future, technology has changed. Relationships? Not so much.
Seth MacFarlane, as Ed Mercer, captain of the Orville.
Seth MacFarlane, as Ed Mercer, captain of the Orville.
Adrianne Lee Palicki, as Kelly Grayson, first officer and the captain's ex-wife.
Adrianne Lee Palicki, as Kelly Grayson, first officer and the captain’s ex-wife.
With a cranium like that, sure you guys don't exist in the Star Trek universe? Should Kirk or Picard be worried?
With a cranium like that, sure you guys don’t exist in the Star Trek universe? Should Kirk or Picard be worried?
Orville looks like it will probably be a great new television comedy.
Orville looks like it will probably be a great new television comedy. From the trolley wrap, it does kind of look like a spoof of Star Trek.
Of course you have to have an artificial lifeform. It's 400 years in the future, right?
Of course you have to have an artificial lifeform. It’s 400 years in the future, right?
The human and non-human relationships are already scrambled on the trolley when doors open. San Diego Comic-Con will soon fill these trolleys with all sorts of unusual, surprising sights!
The human and non-human relationships are already scrambled on the trolley when its doors open. 2017 San Diego Comic-Con will soon have these trolleys bursting with all sorts of unusual, surprising sights!
The first new trolley wrap has appeared for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con!
The first new trolley wrap has appeared for 2017 San Diego Comic-Con!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands of fun photographs (including lots of photos of cosplay and past Comic-Cons) for you to share and enjoy!

Photos of San Diego River, after three storms.

The swollen San Diego River after three winter storms in six days. A gauge beside the water shows the river has subsided to about the 8 foot mark, after reaching a high level--I believe--of around 11 feet.
The swollen San Diego River after three winter storms in six days. A gauge beside the water shows the river has subsided to about the 8 foot mark, after reaching a high level–I believe–of around 11 feet.

I did some walking in a drizzle this morning before work.

I got off the trolley at the Fashion Valley station and proceeded to investigate the San Diego River in a section of Mission Valley that is often hit with flooding. Three very rainy winter storms were finally coming to an end. What did I see?

Palm trees surrounded by river water. Photo taken between the Fashion Valley Transit Center and the Town and Country Resort and Convention Center.
Palm trees surrounded by flowing river water. Photo taken from the pedestrian bridge between the Fashion Valley Transit Center and the Town and Country Resort and Convention Center.
A tall eucalyptus tree knocked over by the gusty winter storms. A common sight around San Diego.
A tall, shallow-rooted eucalyptus tree knocked over by the gusty winter storms. A common sight around San Diego.
Fashion Valley Road this morning was still blocked off from traffic, even though the San Diego River's water had subsided to street level.
Fashion Valley Road this morning was still blocked off from traffic, even though the San Diego River’s water had subsided to street level.
A friendly San Diego Lifeguard makes the rounds to make sure nobody needs a swift water rescue. My photo just missed his wave!
A friendly San Diego Lifeguard makes the rounds to make sure nobody needs a swift water rescue. My photo just missed his wave!
The parking structures at Fashion Valley Mall that are susceptible to flooding were definitely well underwater. Thank goodness, I saw no submerged cars.
The parking structures at Fashion Valley Mall that are susceptible to flooding were definitely well underwater. Thank goodness, I saw no submerged cars.
Bright green grass and dark clouds. I was sheltered from raindrops by the trolley tracks overhead.
Bright green grass and dark clouds. I was sheltered from raindrops by the trolley tracks overhead.
As usual, the San Diego River was flooding Avenida del Rio south of the mall. The short street is appropriately named!
As usual, the San Diego River was flooding Avenida del Rio just south of the mall. The short, dipping street is appropriately named!
Yesterday someone foolishly trying to walk through this powerful moving water had to be rescued. They got washed away. A helicopter was even brought in.
Yesterday someone foolishly trying to walk through this powerful moving water had to be rescued. They got washed away. A helicopter was even brought in.
No worries about flooding for the trolley--at least right here!
No worries about flooding for the trolley–at least right here!
The Highway 163 underpass was flooded and muddy. I had to walk another way around to work. Good thing I got an early start!
The Highway 163 underpass was flooded and muddy. I had to walk another way around to reach work. Good thing I got an early start!
Sign by the San Diego River. The low rainfall and the geologic composition historically allowed the river to run below ground much of the year, hence the nickname--the Upside Down River.
Sign by the San Diego River. The low rainfall and the geologic composition historically allowed the river to run below ground much of the year, hence the nickname: the Upside Down River.
The beautiful river this morning through leaves.
The beautiful river this morning through leaves.
Morning sky and clouds through bare winter river trees.
Morning sky and clouds through bare winter trees.
The San Diego River is unusually wide in its swollen state after the storms. It looks like an honest-to-goodness actual river!
The San Diego River is unusually wide in its swollen state after the storms. It looks like an honest-to-goodness actual river!
Walking along Mission Center Road in the rain by the San Diego River.
Walking along Mission Center Road in the rain by the San Diego River.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Lumberjacks, bicycles and a mysterious tombstone!

Mural depicting three lumberjacks and one enormous tree on the wall of Made Lumber Supply in San Diego.
Mural depicting three lumberjacks and one enormous tree on the wall of Made Lumber Supply in San Diego.

After snapping some photos of this morning’s San Diego River Estuary cleanup (which I’ll blog about tonight), I decided to take a short stroll through a small part of the city that I’ve never thoroughly explored: the few blocks around Sherman Street, near Morena Boulevard.

When I ride to work on the trolley’s Green Line, I often gaze out at a mural of lumberjacks near the old location of the San Diego Humane Society. This morning, as I investigated the mural and surrounding area, look what else I discovered!

Underneath the trolley bridge over Friars Road. Images of animals used to be on the side of this building, Perhaps they were removed when the San Diego Humane Society moved to Gaines Street.
Underneath the trolley bridge over Friars Road. Images of animals used to be on the side of this building, Perhaps they were removed when the San Diego Humane Society moved to nearby Gaines Street.
Another photo of the lumberjack mural, just beyond some real lumber!
Another photo of the lumberjack mural, just beyond some real lumber!
A fourth lumberjack holds a long saw on the side of Made Lumber Supply.
A fourth lumberjack holds a long saw on the side of Made Lumber Supply.
Gigantic ants crawl in a line along the wall of Lloyd Pest Control.
Gigantic ants crawl in a line along the wall of Lloyd Pest Control.
A cool decorative bicycle suspended from a wall. I spotted this at the Reusable Finds resale and repurpose store , near their entrance.
A cool decorative bicycle suspended from a wall. I spotted this at the Reusable Finds resale and repurpose store, near their entrance.
Another rusty bike hanging above a trunk full of flowers.
Another old bike hanging above a trunk full of flowers.
Mural of a fashionable lady on the wall behind the Leatherock leather goods store.
Mural of a fashionable lady on the wall behind the Leatherock leather goods store.
Mysterious wooden tombstone with name of Juan Mendoza, who was shot by Cave Couts in the back with a double-barreled shotgun in Old Town San Diego, February 6, 1865.
Mysterious wooden tombstone with name of Juan Mendoza, who was shot by Cave Couts in the back with a double-barreled shotgun in Old Town San Diego, February 6, 1865.

Look what I stumbled upon at the west end of the old San Diego Humane Society’s parking lot! What appears to be a historic wooden grave marker! Is it real? Why is it here?

You might remember my recent blog post about the Wells Fargo Museum in Old Town. Cave Couts built the wood-frame hotel called the Colorado House in 1851 and became an influential resident of early San Diego. But by some accounts he was a sketchy character. On February 6, 1865 he shot a disgruntled former employee (who worked on one of Cave Couts’ ranches) in the back with a shotgun. This violated the unspoken “Code of the West”. The unfortunate victim who died was Juan Mendoza. A couple years ago I photographed a cross with Juan Mendoza’s name on it at the El Campo Santo cemetery located in Old Town, and I blogged about that here.

So why is there a mysterious wooden tombstone at this location? This marker doesn’t appear a century and a half old. Was it a prop? Is it a prank? Is Mendoza actually buried here? The spot isn’t far from Old Town.  Perhaps someone knows the full story about this completely unexpected discovery. I you do, leave a comment!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Fun photos of Trolley Dances at Fault Line Park!

A fun performance at Fault Line Park in San Diego's East Village during 2016 Trolley Dances!
An imaginative performance at Fault Line Park in San Diego’s East Village during the 2016 Trolley Dances!

Check out these fun photos! They show the energy audiences will experience when they venture downtown to watch the Trolley Dances this year!

The Trolley Dances is all about contemporary dance in surprising public places. This year the Trolley Dances, a collaboration between the San Diego Dance Theater and our Metropolitan Transit System, begins with a performance in Barrio Logan. Mobile audiences, following guides, then make their way by trolley and foot to a variety of unusual downtown locations, where dancers appear like magic and perform. The unique experience lasts about two and a half hours and comes to a conclusion at the relatively new Fault Line Park in East Village. That’s where I snapped a few pics of the final two dances.

I’ll try not to give away too much. Let your imagination go to town–or better yet, buy a ticket. The 2016 Trolley Dances takes places this weekend and next!

A mobile audience arrives at San Diego's Fault Line Park. The park will be the setting of two energetic dances.
A mobile audience arrives at San Diego’s Fault Line Park. The park will be the setting of two energetic dances.
The audience takes a seat. Is something behind that wall?
The audience takes a seat. Is something behind that wall?
Yes, indeed! These dancers seem to have paddled in to shore!
Yes, indeed! These suddenly rising dancers seem to have paddled in to shore!
Perhaps it is an invasion!
Perhaps it’s an invasion!
Dancing on boulders at Fault Line Park! Flight of the Valkyries plays!
Dancing on boulders at Fault Line Park! Flight of the Valkyries plays!
An imaginative work of modern dance at the 2016 Trolley Dances in San Diego.
A unique work of modern dance at the 2016 Trolley Dances in San Diego.
The dancers approach the audience as if rowing a Viking longship...
The dancers approach the audience as if rowing a Viking longship . . .
They have conquered!
They have conquered!
Meanwhile, out on the nearby grass, not far from some folks practicing football, I spot a circle of baseball players...
Meanwhile, out on the nearby grass, not far from some people practicing football skills, I spot a circle of baseball players . . .
These baseball players are also dancers!
These baseball players also happen to be dancers!
Just like professional baseball players, each dancer is introduced by name to the Trolley Dances audience.
Just like professional baseball players, each performer is introduced by name to the Trolley Dances audience.
And a wonderful dance commences...
And a joyful dance commences . . .
Just a lot of fun.
Just a lot of fun.
Dancers rest for a few minutes and await the next mobile audience to arrive at Fault Line Park during the 2016 Trolley Dances.
Dancers rest for a few minutes. They await the next mobile audience that will arrive at Fault Line Park during the 2016 Trolley Dances.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

If you’d like to read a few short stories I’ve written, please visit Short Stories by Richard.

Photos of National City Depot museum and streetcars!

There's more than refreshments and snacks at the National City Depot. There's a huge, cool collection of local railroad and trolley history!
There’s more than refreshments and snacks at the National City Depot. There’s a huge, cool collection of local railroad and trolley history!

If you’re a train or streetcar lover, prepare to go nuts! The friendly guys at the National City Depot, which is home to the Trolley and Railroad Museum operated by the San Diego Electric Railway Association, allowed me to take loads of photographs a couple weekends ago! The place is so crammed with cool stuff, I hardly know where to start!

(Before I get started, however, I learned the National City Depot is in desperate need of volunteer docents and cashiers. So if you live around San Diego and have some free time, please consider this opportunity. Railroading enthusiasts would be in heaven. If you’d like, you might actually roll up your sleeves and help work to revitalize several vintage streetcars. You can have a great time preserving and enlivening our local history of trolleys by explaining exhibits and sharing knowledge with curious visitors, tourists and school students. SDERA’s stated mission is to restore and preserve the history of electric railways and trolleys in the San Diego region. Click here for more info.)

As you can see from the first photo, the depot has a number of old railroad cars and streetcars sitting outside on either side of it. The San Diego Metropolitan Transit System, MTS, has provided the private association with three old Vienna streetcars and one Presidents Conference Committee (PCC) streetcar. The latter is undergoing restoration, and will eventually be used as a cool tourist attraction, running over the Coronado Belt Line of the San Diego and Arizona Eastern Railroad!

You might recognize the name San Diego Electric Railway. It was the mass transit system built by locally famous “sugar heir” and entrepreneur John D. Spreckels. His network of railroads was established in 1892, and active streetcars served a large area of the city for many decades. The San Diego Electric Railway Association proudly displays some examples of the rolling stock that were utilized in those glory years of electric streetcars.

The National City Depot has its own fascinating history. It was built in 1882 by the Santa Fe Railroad, and became the first Pacific Coast terminus station of their transcontinental line. Today, it’s the last representative of the original stations built on the West Coast by the five different transcontinental railroads. After various changes in its operations over the decades, the depot was abandoned in the 1960s and suffered severe neglect. Before finally reopening as a museum, it was also used as a unique building for a couple of restaurants. It’s now owned by the city of National City.

I learned so much during my visit, my brain is still whirling. If I’ve captioned the photos incorrectly, or have made some sort of factual error, please leave a comment!

Here come the photos, just a taste of what you might see should you swing on by.  Enjoy!

The National City Depot was built in 1882. It was the western terminus of the Santa Fe Railroad's transcontinental line.
The National City Depot was built in 1882. It was the first Pacific Coast terminus station of the Santa Fe Railroad’s transcontinental line.
Plaque in front of National City Depot, the West Coast station of Santa Fe's transcontinental railroad. California Registered Historical Landmark No. 1023.
Plaque in front of National City Depot, the first Pacific Coast terminus station of Santa Fe’s transcontinental railroad. California Registered Historical Landmark No. 1023.
Inside the small depot are display cases full of model trains and streetcars, plus artifacts and memorabilia. The walls are covered with old photos and historical information.
Inside the small depot are display cases full of model trains and streetcars, plus artifacts and memorabilia. The walls are covered with old photos and historical information.
The famous old train station sits alongside BNSF tracks which are still active. The National City Depot played in instrumental role in American railroad history.
The famous old train station sits alongside BNSF tracks which are still active. The National City Depot played in instrumental role in American railroad history.
There's so much cool stuff crammed inside the museum, a railfan could spend hours closely examining all of it!
There’s so much cool stuff crammed inside the museum, a railfan could spend hours closely examining all of it!
A magazine article on display for train buffs and history enthusiasts to check out. Buses replace the old network of trolleys in 1949.
A magazine article on display for train buffs and history enthusiasts to check out. Buses finally replaced the old network of San Diego trolleys in 1949.
One of many old photos in the museum depicting San Diego's very rich electric streetcar history.
One of many old photos in the museum depicting San Diego’s very rich electric streetcar history.
A collection of old lanterns. Everything imaginable concerning San Diego railroads and trolleys can be found inside the National City Depot.
A collection of old lanterns. Everything imaginable concerning San Diego railroads and trolleys can be found inside the National City Depot.
Faded writing on the brick fireplace recalls when the eventually abandoned depot was used as a restaurant. Black panels on the walls cover graffiti.
Faded writing on the brick fireplace recalls when the eventually abandoned depot was used as a restaurant. Black panels on the walls cover graffiti.
One section of a wall has lots of photos of vintage streetcars and trolleys.
One section of a wall has lots of photos of vintage streetcars and trolleys.
A second room inside the National City Depot contains a huge model train layout! The exhibit is run when the depot is open Thursdays to Sundays from 9am to 5pm. It appears that SDERA members have a lot of fun!
A second room inside the National City Depot contains a huge model train layout! The exhibit is run when the depot is open Thursdays to Sundays from 9am to 5pm. It appears that SDERA members have a lot of fun!
The best photo I could get of a big antique Raymond and Wilshire safe in the historic transcontinental depot. I had to squeeze up against the model train layout.
The best photo I could get of a big antique Raymond and Wilshire safe in the historic transcontinental depot. I had to squeeze up against the model train layout.
Now we're outside beside the depot at a picnic bench! I liked these two planters in the shape of steam locomotives!
Now we’re outside beside the depot at a picnic bench! I like these two planters in the shape of steam locomotives!
Two of National City Depot's three old Austrian streetcars. These were going to be used by MTS for the San Diego Trolley in the Gaslamp Quarter, but couldn't meet ADA standards, as I understand it.
Two of National City Depot’s three old Austrian streetcars. These were going to be used by MTS for the San Diego Trolley in the Gaslamp Quarter, but couldn’t meet ADA standards, as I understand it.
Sign inside one Vienna street car details the history. They were originally built at the Simmering Machine and Railcar Works, Simmering, Austria.
Sign inside one Vienna street car details the history. They were originally built at the Simmering Machine and Railcar Works, Simmering, Austria.
Now we're stepping into one of the old Austrian streetcars!
Now we’re stepping like a passenger into one of the old Austrian streetcars!
The controls used by the electric streetcar operator. Notice the chair which folds under the dash.
The controls used by this electric streetcar’s operator. Notice a seat that folds under the dashboard.
Looking back where passengers would sit. There didn't seem to be much capacity in the small cars.
Looking back where passengers would sit. There didn’t seem to be much capacity in the small cars.
Now we're checking out Birney Car 336, out in the open lot beside the National City Depot. This is one type of streetcar that transported people in San Diego decades ago.
Now we’re checking out Birney Car 336, out in the open lot beside the National City Depot. This is one type of streetcar that transported people in San Diego decades ago.
Birney Car 336 was built by the St. Louis Car Company in 1917, and first served in Bellingham, WA. It later was used for dining inside the Old Spaghetti Factory in San Diego, from 1971 to 2004!
Birney Car 336 was built by the St. Louis Car Company in 1917, and first served in Bellingham, WA. It later was used for dining inside the Old Spaghetti Factory in San Diego, from 1971 to 2004!
Inside the old Birney Car. I'm hungry for some spaghetti! Where are the chairs?
Inside the old Birney Car. I’m hungry for some spaghetti! Where are the chairs?
Cool vintage advertisements along the car's ceiling include this one for Burma-Shave.
Cool vintage advertisements along the car’s ceiling include this one for Burma-Shave.
A big, heavy tamping machine used for maintaining railroad tracks and placing them more firmly onto packed ballast.
A big, heavy tamping machine used for maintaining railroad tracks and placing them more firmly onto packed ballast.
A second ballast tamper outside the National City Depot. I always wondered what these unusual machines that you see on train tracks were for.
A second ballast tamper outside the National City Depot. I always wondered what these unusual machines that you see on train tracks are for.
Part of the machinery that pushes down on the steel rails and ties. This makes sure train tracks are solidly in place.
Part of the machinery that pushes down on the steel rails and ties. This makes sure train tracks are solidly in place and level.
Gazing back north past various rail exhibits outside the National City Depot.
Gazing back north past various rail exhibits outside the National City Depot. Isn’t this fun?
Now we'll check out PCC Car 539, which was donated to SDERA by the Metropolitan Transit System.
Now we’ll check out PCC Car 539, which was donated to SDERA by the Metropolitan Transit System.
PCC Car 539 was built in 1946 by the St. Louis Car Company. It served as a streetcar in St. Louis until 1956. Restoration is underway. One day it might run nearby as a tourist attraction.
PCC Car 539 was built in 1946 by the St. Louis Car Company. It served as a streetcar in St. Louis until 1956. Restoration is underway. One day it might run nearby as a tourist attraction.
Inside the fabulous PCC car. The San Diego Trolley has two completely restored cars of this type, now running on downtown's Silver Line.
Inside the fabulous PCC car. The San Diego Trolley now has two completely restored cars of this type, running in a downtown loop called the Silver Line.
I believe this is a Fairmont Speeder Car. Tiny crew cars were used to transport a few individual workers up and down tracks. I'd love to ride one!
I believe this is a Fairmont Speeder Car. Tiny crew cars were used to transport a few individual workers up and down tracks. I’d love to ride one!
Oh, man! I bet you'd love to sit in one of these seats and ride the rails! Just turn the throttle to go!
Oh, man! I bet you’d love to sit in one of these seats and ride the rails! Just turn the throttle to go!
Seriously? This one is basically a bicycle for train tracks! Except it has four wheels! And a bike chain, of course!
Seriously? This one is basically a bicycle for train tracks! Except it has four wheels! And a bike chain, of course!
This luggage cart near the entrance to the National City Depot was donated by the Maritime Museum of San Diego--it evidently was aboard the steamboat Berkeley at one time.
This luggage cart near the entrance to the National City Depot was donated by the Maritime Museum of San Diego–it evidently was aboard the steam ferry Berkeley at one time.
One of several cool vintage handcars. Just like you see in those old Western movies.
One of several cool vintage handcars. Just like you see in those old Western movies.
This unusual three-wheeled handcar reminds me of a canoe outrigger!
This unusual three-wheeled handcar reminds me of a canoe outrigger!
San Diego Electric Railway Association's fun Herbie is a Brill streetcar replica. A parade and car show's popular Streetcar on Wheels!
San Diego Electric Railway Association’s fun Herbie is a Brill streetcar replica. A parade and car show’s popular Streetcar on Wheels!
An antique open air streetcar at the National City Depot. This a grip car, like the cable cars in San Francisco. Few people realize that San Diego had a cable car line that briefly ran from the Gaslamp to University Heights in the early 1890s!
An antique open air streetcar at the National City Depot. This a grip car, like the cable cars in San Francisco. Few people realize that San Diego had a cable car line that briefly ran from the Gaslamp to University Heights in the early 1890s!
Elegant number 54 was operated by the San Diego Electric Railway Company according to its markings. The yellow paint is peeling.
Elegant number 54 is a unique composite, built using two different San Diego Cable Railway cars. I see panes of stained glass. The yellow paint is peeling.
The third Vienna streetcar in the National City Depot's collection, number 6888, is yellow.
The third Vienna streetcar in the National City Depot’s collection, number 6888, is yellow.
There's a lot of very cool stuff to see at the National City Depot, in San Diego's South Bay!
There’s a ton of very cool stuff to see at the National City Depot, in San Diego’s South Bay!

I live in downtown San Diego and walk all over the place! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag. There are thousands upon thousands of fun images (including lots of model and historical train photographs) for you to enjoy! Feel free to share! Have some fun!