Photos of the San Diego Wooden Boat Festival!

A few vessels the public can visit during the San Diego Wooden Boat Festival at the Koehler Kraft boatyard on Shelter Island.
A few vessels the public can visit during the San Diego Wooden Boat Festival at the Koehler Kraft boatyard on Shelter Island.

Yesterday I headed over to Shelter Island to check out the annual San Diego Wooden Boat Festival. The event is taking place all Father’s Day weekend at the Koehler Kraft boatyard. Proceeds from the festival help out local charities.

Koehler Kraft is where many wooden boat owners head if their vessel needs a repair or upgrade. The boatyard was founded in 1938. I enjoyed poking around the place, and examining some very cool vintage wooden boats. There were also beautiful newer boats, and a few had unusual, fascinating designs.

Enjoy my photos and read the captions to learn more!

A look at the Koehler Kraft boatyard from a platform that juts out over the edge of Shelter Cove Marina in Americas Cup Harbor.
A look at the Koehler Kraft boatyard from a platform that juts out over the edge of Shelter Cove Marina in Americas Cup Harbor.
People walk out to look at some wooden boats during a very cool festival on Shelter Island.
People walk out to look at some wooden boats during a very cool festival on Shelter Island.
Koehler Kraft's San Diego Wooden Boat Festival is taking place on Father's Day weekend.
Koehler Kraft’s San Diego Wooden Boat Festival is taking place on Father’s Day weekend.
Various boats in the boatyard are being worked on. Some displays show the public how wooden boats are made.
Various boats in the boatyard are being worked on. Some displays show the public how wooden boats are made.
One can see the framework of this small wooden boat.
One can see the exposed framework of this small wooden boat.
Inside the Koehler Kraft building are several more wooden boats. The big one being worked on is Siwash, a 1910 yawl that held the round Catalina time record for 27 years.
Inside the Koehler Kraft building are several more wooden boats. The big one being worked on is Siwash, a 1910 yawl that held the round Catalina time record for 27 years.
Friendly folks show off lots of cool stuff at Koehler Kraft.
Friendly folks show off lots of cool stuff at Koehler Kraft.
I love how wood is everywhere. Working here must be a woodworkers dream.
I love how wood is everywhere. Working here must be a woodworker’s dream.
Another boat is being worked upon. The varnished wood is simply beautiful.
Another boat is being worked upon. The varnished wood is simply beautiful.
Now we're outside again, looking down at the water where many boats crafted from wood await.
Now we’re outside again, looking down at the water where many boats crafted from wood await.
Boats can be moved into and out of the water using these old rails and a wheeled platform.
Boats can be moved into and out of the water using these old rails and a wheeled platform.
The Marjorie is an elegant wooden boat.
The Marjorie is an elegant wooden boat.
Visitors to the San Diego Wooden Boat Festival check out a variety of interesting vessels.
Visitors to the San Diego Wooden Boat Festival check out a variety of interesting vessels.
This small boat is named Tom. It's a 2015 catboat. Carvel planked Port Oxford cedar on white oak frames.
This small boat is named Tom. It’s a 2015 catboat. Carvel planked Port Oxford cedar on white oak frames.
The stern of Old Glory.
Water reflects rippled light on the smooth stern of Old Glory.
Some guys and a dog on the deck of Sally, of the San Diego Yacht Club.
Some guys and a dog on the deck of Sally, of the San Diego Yacht Club.
Wooden boats have amazing character. Even the weathering adds personality.
Wooden boats have amazing character. Even the weathering adds personality.
One's eyes can take delight in these boats all day long.
One’s eyes can take delight in these boats all day long.
I believe I've seen the Patricia Belle at the yearly Festival of Sail. It's a schooner cargo type boat built in 1998.
I believe I’ve seen the Patricia Belle at the yearly Festival of Sail. It’s a schooner cargo type boat built in 1998.
Everyone is checking out these great boats!
Everyone is checking out these great boats!
Someone peers down into a beautiful wooden sailboat.
Someone peers down into a beautiful wooden sailboat.

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Carefree street art on Shelter Island Drive!

Sailboats are painted on the side of the building at 2608 Shelter Island Drive in San Diego.
Sailboats are painted on the side of the building at 2608 Shelter Island Drive in San Diego.

Today I headed over to the San Diego Wooden Boat Festival on Shelter Island. As I walked to the festival down Shelter Island Drive, I noticed several works of sun-splashed, carefree street art! Here they are!

The beautiful mural shows sailboats racing on the blue ocean.
One side of the beautiful mural shows sailboats racing on the blue ocean.
The artwork reflects the beautiful marinas and busy boatyards around Shelter Island on San Diego Bay.
The artwork reflects the busy marinas and boatyards around Shelter Island on San Diego Bay.
Electrical box on Shelter Island Drive has two seagulls.
An electrical box on Shelter Island Drive has two seagulls.
Make that three!
Make that three!
The water off Point Loma in this painted street art seems to glisten and sparkle.
The water off Point Loma in this painted street art seems to glisten and sparkle.
One side of a utility box shows the back of a young boy playing on a bench with a toy boat.
One side of a utility box shows the back of a young boy playing on a bench with a toy boat.
One side of the same box. We now see the side of the boy who is holding his boat.
Another side of the same box. We now see the left side of the boy who is holding his boat.
And now the front. All four sides show the same happy scene. Some fun 3-dimensional street art on Shelter Island!
And now the front. All four sides show the same happy scene. Some fun, creative 3-dimensional street art on Shelter Island!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of fun photos for you to share and enjoy!

Tuna fishermen bronze sculpture and memorial.

Three bronze fishermen on Shelter Island together reel in a huge tuna.
Three bronze fishermen on Shelter Island together reel in a large tuna.

A monumental bronze sculpture in Shoreline Park on Shelter Island has become an iconic image. The Tunaman’s Memorial, by artist Franco Vianello, dedicated in 1988, honors the courage and hard work of generations of tuna fishermen in San Diego. The 9,000 pound sculpture depicts three individuals pole fishing from a boat of the once-large tuna fleet out on the Pacific Ocean. The history of San Diego’s tuna fishing industry contains generations of life stories. These unwritten stories involve fishermen who immigrated from many different nations, including Italy, Portugal and Japan.

One polished side of the sculpture contains names of fishermen who were pioneers in our region, and those who were lost at sea. An inscription reads: Tunaman’s Memorial honoring those that built an industry and remembering those that departed this harbor in the sun and did not return. Anthony Mascarenhas.

The Tunaman's Memorial on Shelter Island is a 7,000 bronze sculpture honoring generations of fishermen.
The Tunaman’s Memorial on Shelter Island is a 9,000 pound bronze sculpture honoring generations of diverse fishermen.
Tuna fishing in local waters was once a major industry in San Diego.
Tuna fishing in local waters was once a major industry in San Diego.
Polished side of Tunaman's Memorial contains names of San Diego fishing pioneers and those who were lost at sea.
Polished side of Tunaman’s Memorial contains names of San Diego fishing pioneers, and those who were lost at sea.
This iconic sight on Shelter Island provides a glimpse back in history, at those in our community who worked the sea.
This iconic sight on Shelter Island provides a glimpse back in history, at those in our community who worked the sea.

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Pacific Rim nations celebrated with beautiful art.

A portion of the elegant Pearl of the Pacific, by artist James T. Hubbell.
A portion of the elegant Pearl of the Pacific, by artist James T. Hubbell.

On the southwest end of Shelter Island you’ll discover some wonderful public art titled Pearl of the Pacific. Benches, a soaring sculpture, and a circle of colorful tiles arranged around a pearl-like bubbling fountain celebrate the diverse nations of the Pacific Rim. Local artist James Hubbell and a group of architectural students worked with artists from San Diego’s sister cities Vladivostok, Russia, Tijuana, Mexico and Yantai, China, to create this very cool sight. The central mosaic of tiles, pointing north, south, east and west like a fantastic compass, includes images that represent the sister cities. Pearl of the Pacific pays tribute to San Diego’s cultural and economic relations with peaceful neighbors united by the ocean.

I’ve already blogged about several of James Hubbell’s works of art around San Diego. You might enjoy seeing his Pacific Portal, Sea Passage and Pacific Spirit.

Gazing south past Pearl of the Pacific toward the channel that leads from San Diego Bay to the ocean.
Gazing south past Pearl of the Pacific toward the channel that leads from San Diego Bay to the ocean.
At the southwest end of Shelter Island, a circle of colorful tiles is arranged about a large pearl.
At the southwest end of Shelter Island, a circle of colorful tiles is arranged about a large pearl.
The central pearl is a fountain that bubbles with water. It wasn't running the day I took these photographs.
The central pearl is a fountain that bubbles with water. It wasn’t running the day I took these photographs.
Pearl of the Pacific Park plaque describes tile images and their meaning.
Pearl of the Pacific Park plaque describes tile images and their meaning.
North.
North. An inspirational American bird.
South.
South. The mythical Quetzalcoatl of Mexico.
West.
West. A Siberian tiger from Russia.
East. A dragon representing China.
East. A dragon representing China.
Plaque reads Tijuana, Mexico.
Plaque reads Tijuana, Mexico.
One column contains a pearl-like globe of shining blue tiles.
One column contains a pearl-like globe of shining blue tiles.
A soaring sculptural arch made of beautiful ironwork.
A soaring sculptural arch made of beautiful ironwork.
A bench in the small park-like area is topped with more colorful tiles.
A bench in the small park-like area is topped with more colorful tiles.
Another artistic bench. This is a good spot to watch sailboats and ships on the nearby water.
Another artistic bench. This is a good spot to watch sailboats and ships on the nearby water.
Bits of sea shells, broken pottery and cultural motifs in a curving concrete wall.
Bits of sea shells, broken pottery and cultural motifs in a curving concrete wall.
Pearl of the Pacific pays tribute to San Diego's ocean neighbors and sister cities.
Pearl of the Pacific pays tribute to San Diego’s ocean neighbors and sister cities.

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An easy walk along Shelter Island’s Shoreline Park.

At the southwest end of Shelter Island, near the end of Shoreline Park, are some works of art. The female life-size bronze sculpture is Pacific Spirit, by James Hubbell, 2002.
At the southwest end of Shelter Island, near the end of Shoreline Park, are some works of art. The female life-size bronze sculpture is Pacific Spirit, by James Hubbell, 2002.

I was off from work yesterday. In the late morning I headed down to Shelter Island. It’s another of my favorite places. After a bite to eat, I enjoyed an easy, peaceful walk while gathering photos for future blog posts. Expect some cool sights in the coming weeks!

The path that extends the length of narrow Shoreline Park is just about perfect. The park itself is located at the very edge of the bay, stretching from one end of Shelter Island to the other. In one place the path traverses what seems to be more of a large parking lot than a park, but no matter. I love the place. It’s relaxed, usually non-crowded, and just beautiful. There are amazing views of San Diego Bay, sailboats and a large variety of ships, scenic Point Loma, a slice of ocean horizon, the distant Coronado Islands (when it isn’t hazy), busy Naval Air Station North Island and the skyline of downtown San Diego. I often see people sitting on lawn chairs with binoculars, just watching boats pass by, jets take off from North Island, and birds that wheel and dive through the blue sky.

People walk along the pathway which stretches down narrow Shoreline Park. Grass, benches and picnic tables invite both locals and tourists.
People walk along the pathway which stretches down narrow Shoreline Park. Grass, benches and picnic tables invite both locals and tourists.
Bougainvillea and lath provide shade on a sunny warm summer morning. Several of these structures are found along the park
Bougainvillea and lath provide shade on a sunny warm summer morning. Several of these structures are found along the park.
Bicyclist cruises past a raised Osprey nesting platform. A sign nearby provides an explanation.
Bicyclist cruises past a raised Osprey nesting platform. A sign nearby provides an explanation.
A large Navy warship entering San Diego harbor is seen beyond the Shelter Island pier. Downtown skyscrapers appear misty in the background.
A large Navy warship entering San Diego harbor is seen beyond the Shelter Island pier. Downtown skyscrapers appear misty in the background.
Fathom Bistro, Bait and Tackle sign at foot of Shelter Island fishing pier. They've been open a couple years now.
Fathom Bistro, Bait and Tackle sign at foot of Shelter Island fishing pier. They’ve been open a couple years now.
Someone next to the pathway along Shoreline Park balanced a bunch of rocks up on top of each other. Perhaps it was someone who was fishing.
Someone next to the pathway along Shoreline Park balanced a bunch of rocks up on top of each other. Perhaps it was someone who was fishing.
Another cool photo of Shelter Island's dinghy landing. I published a post with similar photos a year or two ago.
Another cool photo of Shelter Island’s dinghy landing. I published a post with similar photos a year or two ago.
Huge swaths of sand along the water are simply covered with gull tracks.
Huge swaths of sand along the water are simply covered with gull tracks.
Someone spreads a big bag of old bread along the small Shelter Island beach, sending the seagulls into a wild feeding frenzy!
Someone spreads a big bag of old bread along the small Shelter Island beach, sending the seagulls into a wild feeding frenzy!
It's a quiet weekday morning outside the Outboard Boating Club of San Diego's building near the Shelter Island boat ramp. A nearby flagpole is empty.
It’s a quiet weekday morning outside the Outboard Boating Club of San Diego’s building near the Shelter Island boat ramp. A nearby flagpole is empty.
At the base of the flagpole: The Holiday Express. This plaque cast of brass from the aircraft carrier USS Bunkerhill CV-17 is dedicated to that gallant ship and her courageous crew.
At the base of the flagpole: The Holiday Express. This plaque cast of brass from the aircraft carrier USS Bunkerhill CV-17 is dedicated to that gallant ship and her courageous crew.
Perhaps you remember my blog post "Wally the sociable sea lion greets boaters". I saw him again during another walk at the same boat launching area!
Perhaps you remember my fun blog post “Wally the sociable sea lion greets boaters.” I saw him again during another walk at the same boat launching area!
Floating peacefully along the edge of San Diego Bay, enjoying the calm water and bright sunshine.
Floating peacefully along the edge of San Diego Bay, enjoying the calm water and bright sunshine.
Someone ready to row off Shelter Island's dinghy landing, perhaps heading to a boat moored nearby.
Someone is ready to row off Shelter Island’s dinghy landing, perhaps heading to a boat moored nearby.

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San Diego and Yokohama: friendship, a girl and a bell.

A simple but meaningful pavilion stands at the west end of Shelter Island. It holds the Bell of Friendship.
A simple but meaningful pavilion stands at the west end of Shelter Island. It holds the Bell of Friendship.

At the west end of Shelter Island, which lies near the entrance to San Diego Bay, you’ll find a testament to the enduring friendship that has been established between two sister cities. San Diego and Yokohama are located on opposite sides of the wide Pacific Ocean, yet these two beautiful cities are closely connected.

In 1958 a large bronze traditional Japanese bell was dedicated on Shelter Island with great ceremony.  It’s located in a prominent spot; ships from countries throughout the world pass it every day. The bell, created by Masahiko Katori, one of Japan’s living National Treasures, was presented during a Centennial Celebration which marked a hundred years of formal relations between the United States and Japan. The bell hangs in a pavilion surrounded by a narrow moat of water and a space of green grass.

The Bell of Friendship, which is six feet high and almost two and half tons, is seldom rung; but on New Year’s Eve the ram strikes the heavy bronze, resonating deeply–many say spiritually–welcoming a hopeful future.

The Japanese Friendship Bell was presented by the City of Yokohama to the people of San Diego in 1958 as a symbol of eternal friendship.
The Japanese Friendship Bell was presented by the City of Yokohama to the people of San Diego in 1958 as a symbol of eternal friendship.
This magnificent bell was cast by the artist Masahiko Katori who has been designated as a living National Treasure by the government of Japan.
This magnificent bell was cast by the artist Masahiko Katori who has been designated as a Living National Treasure by the government of Japan.
The Japanese Friendship Bell is one of several landmarks that can be seen along the length of San Diego's park-like Shelter Island.
The Japanese Friendship Bell is one of several landmarks that can be seen along the length of Shoreline Park on Shelter Island.

At the front of the simple pavilion stands a three foot tall sculpture of a young girl. “The Girl in Red Shoes” by Japanese artist Munehiro Komeno debuted in 2010 and represents the friendship between the ports of San Diego and Yokohama. The sculpture portrays Kimi, a Japanese orphan who was adopted by a loving American couple in the 1920s. The girl was later diagnosed with tuberculosis and couldn’t leave Japan. The touching story has been told many times, and has become a symbol of the goodwill that exists between our two nations. Kimi holds a rose and carnation. The rose symbolizes Yokohama; the carnation is San Diego.

The Girl in Red Shoes by Munehiro Komeno. June 2, 2009. Kimi represents close friendship between the United States and Japan.
The Girl in Red Shoes by Munehiro Komeno. June 2, 2009. Kimi represents close friendship between the United States and Japan.
Biking past a unique and beautiful sight on a glorious summer day.
Biking past a unique and beautiful sight on a glorious summer day.

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Infinite words but just one small life.

Sailboats moored near Shelter Island, downtown San Diego skyline in the background.
Sailboats moored near Shelter Island, downtown San Diego in the background.

Anyone who tries to write soon realizes a daunting truth. There are countless possible stories to tell, and numberless ways to tell each one. Infinity multiplied by infinity amounts to a whole lot of indecision!

Last weekend I stood on a patch of beach on Shelter Island. A sailboat moored nearby fascinated my eye, and I puzzled over its profound complexity for several minutes. How could I accurately paint that sailboat with words? How could I phrase the most perfect description? Is it even possible? With a million words is it possible?

As I watched the bobbing boat and struggled to sequence potent adjectives, a sudden thought shook me: Writing’s purpose, like art’s purpose, isn’t to replicate the world. It’s to stretch our minds. That is all.

Words are limitless. As limitless as the universe. They allow us to travel anywhere, in any direction.

A few well-directed words can focus our minds (for a moment) on overlooked things; they can help us see vague things more vividly. Words can seek and memorialize those things that seem important. Words tossed about can provoke hidden feeling and allow us to draw nearer to others. Words, when magical, can help us to discern whispers of meaning in the echoing vastness around us.

Our lives are finite. But the infinity that is contained in words can expand our lives. That is their purpose.

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