A peek at Butcher Boy’s restoration at Spanish Landing.

All sorts of wood can be found under the North Harbor Drive Bridge, where the historic boat Butcher Boy is undergoing a thorough restoration.
All sorts of wood can be found under the North Harbor Drive Bridge, where the historic boat Butcher Boy is undergoing a thorough restoration.

This morning, as I drove up Harbor Drive toward Point Loma, I suddenly remembered that the Maritime Museum of San Diego’s turn-of-the-century racing sloop Butcher Boy is being restored at Spanish Landing, where the galleon San Salvador was built a few years back. Work on the much smaller Butcher Boy is being carried out in a sheltered place under the North Harbor Drive Bridge.

Even though I’m no expert when it comes to sloops–or nautical stuff in general–I do love to look at boats and ships that sail. There seems to be something about white sails, sunlight on water, and wind-lashed voyages across rolling expanses that appeals deeply to the human spirit.

So, anyway, I decided to pull into the nearby parking lot to see what progress has been made in restoring Butcher Boy to its former glory.

I was able to take a few photos.

Even though no museum volunteers were at work in the early morning, and the large ship saw was covered with a tarp, a nearby sign provided some interesting information about these unique saws used by shipwrights. The angle of a ship saw blade can be changed as a cut is being made, so that compound curves can be created with a single cut.

An internet wooden boat forum that I found has some fascinating info about the history of Butcher Boy, including:

“Butcher Boy, which had similarly named counterparts up and down the West Coast, was conceived by Charles S. Hardy, owner of the Bay City Market on Fifth and Broadway downtown.

‘Boss Hardy,’ as he was known, needed a boat sturdy enough to handle any weather and fast enough to beat competitors out to the big ships anchored offshore, off what was commonly known as Spanish Bight and Dutch Flats.

Hardy turned to boatyard owner Manuel Goularte, a native of the Portuguese Azores. The model was the double-ended salmon boat sailed so successfully on the Sacramento and Columbia rivers.

A boat-building style that originated in Italy and the Mediterranean can also be seen in Butcher Boy, said Ashley, a style then favored by first-generation Italian fishermen in San Francisco Bay.

‘The gaff rig originated with the 15th-century Dutch,’ Ashley said. ‘Even though she was built as a work boat, she was beautiful, really special even in her own time.’

‘Everybody around the bay stops to look at her now. It’s like she’s sailing out of a Winslow Homer painting.’

Framed in oak and planked in cedar, Butcher Boy is 29 feet, 11 inches long, with an 81/2-foot beam. The mainsail and jib carry 604 square feet of sail.”

If you are curious, and want to see historical photos of Butcher Boy under sail, and a detailed description of the restoration work now being done, please read the Maritime Museum of San Diego’s blog by clicking here.

A sign that describes a ship saw, recalling how this one was used to help build the Spanish galleon replica San Salvador.
A sign that describes a ship saw, recalling how this particular one was used to build the Spanish galleon replica San Salvador.
Lots of lumber!
Lots of lumber!
I took this photo of the unrestored Butcher Boy two and a half years ago for another blog post. At the time it was on display on the barge behind the Maritime Museum of San Diego’s steam ferry Berkeley.
Photo of the Butcher Boy's restoration in progress, taken one August 2018 morning at San Diego's Spanish Landing.
Photo of the Butcher Boy’s restoration in progress, taken one August 2018 morning at San Diego’s Spanish Landing.

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A sunny walk from the airport to Spanish Landing.

Playing catch with a dog on the small beach at Spanish Landing Park. A sailboat moves through Harbor Island's West Basin, heading out to San Diego Bay.
Playing catch with a dog on the small beach at Spanish Landing Park. A sailboat moves through Harbor Island’s West Basin, heading out to San Diego Bay.

A wide path for walkers and bicyclists runs from San Diego’s Embarcadero to Spanish Landing. While the portion between the Coast Guard station and Harbor Island Drive isn’t terribly scenic (it’s located right next to Harbor Drive and a lot of airport traffic), the section that meanders through Spanish Landing Park provides a peaceful, pleasant stroll. And a chance to learn a bit about San Diego’s history!

Today I took a long walk up the sunny path. Here are some photos. I pulled out my camera near Lindbergh Field and kept snapping pics all the way to the west end of Spanish Landing Park. (And beyond, as you’ll see in coming blog posts!)

As usual, please refer to the captions. You might note that Spanish Landing received its name because the 1769 expedition by Spanish explorer Gaspar de Portolá anchored in San Diego Bay near this place. The bay was much different back then–in modern times it has been extensively dredged and expanded. Indeed, Harbor Island, which you see in some photos, was originally a sandbank! Harbor Island today is composed of dredge spoils.

A long path along Harbor Drive runs from the Embarcadero in downtown San Diego to Spanish Landing. Bicyclists head up the path on a sunny weekend.
A long path along Harbor Drive runs from the Embarcadero in downtown San Diego to Spanish Landing. Bicyclists head up the path on a sunny weekend.
This mural can be spotted across Harbor Drive as one approaches Lindbergh Field. Painted on the commuter terminal, it spells SAN, the code for San Diego International Airport.
This mural can be spotted across Harbor Drive as one approaches Lindbergh Field. Painted on the commuter terminal by Jari “Werc” Alvarez, it spells SAN, the code for San Diego International Airport.
The path, at the edge of San Diego Bay, is part of the California Coastal Trail. It's ideal for walking or biking from downtown to Spanish Landing Park, and beyond.
The path, near the edge of San Diego Bay, is part of the California Coastal Trail. It’s ideal for walking or biking from downtown to Spanish Landing Park, and beyond.
A photo with my camera lifted toward the sky on a fine Saturday in mid-October.
A photo with my camera lifted toward the sky on a fine Saturday in mid-October.
A quick photo of Cancer Survivors Park, on the east end of Spanish Landing Park. I've blogged about this special place a couple of times.
A quick photo of Cancer Survivors Park, on the east end of Spanish Landing Park. I’ve blogged about this special place a couple of times.
Kayak heads across the water toward boats docked at a Harbor Island marina.
Kayak heads across the water toward boats docked at a Harbor Island marina.  Hotels on Harbor Island are resting on soil dredged up from the bay.
I remember hearing the Callaway Carillon bell tower near the center of Spanish Landing Park when I was a child. I believe it no longer works. I hope I'm wrong.
I remember hearing the Callaway Carillon bell tower near the center of Spanish Landing Park when I was a child. I believe it no longer works. I hope I’m wrong.
Plaque near base of the electronic bell tower. The Callaway Carillon is presented to the Port of San Diego by Thearle Music Company Associates . . . 1973
Plaque near base of the electronic bell tower. The Callaway Carillon is presented to the Port of San Diego by Thearle Music Company Associates . . . 1973
Walkers pause on the path through Spanish Landing to read a California Historical Landmark plaque near the water.
Walkers pause on the path through Spanish Landing to read a California Historical Landmark plaque near the water.
Spanish Landing. Near this point, sea and land parties of the Portola-Serra Expedition met. Two ships, the San Antonio and San Carlos, anchored on May 4-5, 1769.
Spanish Landing. Near this point, sea and land parties of the Portola-Serra Expedition met. Two ships, the San Antonio and San Carlos, anchored on May 4-5, 1769.
A bit further up the path is a playground and a popular spot for parties and celebrations on the nearby grass.
A bit further up the path is a playground and a popular spot for parties and celebrations on the nearby grass.
Bronze artwork near the path through Spanish Landing honors those who lost their lives, during the sea journey by Gaspar de Portolá up the coast.
Bronze artwork near the path through Spanish Landing honors those who lost their lives, during the sea journey by Gaspar de Portolá up the coast, two and a half centuries ago.
Dedicated to the heroic Spaniards who gave their lives and were buried near this site in 1769-70, after accompanying Gaspar de Portolá, the first Governor of California, in the exploration of California from San Diego to San Francisco.
Dedicated to the heroic Spaniards who gave their lives and were buried near this site in 1769-70, after accompanying Gaspar de Portolá, the first Governor of California, in the exploration of California from San Diego to San Francisco.
Many benches along Spanish Landing Park provide views of the peaceful water and Harbor Island.
Many benches along Spanish Landing Park provide views of the peaceful water and nearby Harbor Island.
Bicyclists near the west end of Spanish Landing Park. By crossing the North Harbor Drive Bridge, one can enter Point Loma.
Bicyclists near the west end of Spanish Landing Park. By crossing the North Harbor Drive Bridge, one can enter Point Loma.
The North Harbor Drive Bridge was dedicated in June 1980.
The North Harbor Drive Bridge was dedicated in June 1980.
Paddleboarders float down the boat channel between North Harbor Drive Bridge and the adjacent Nimitz Bridge, which is now used by pedestrians. The grass in the distance is part of the Liberty Station Esplanade.
Paddleboarders float down the boat channel, between North Harbor Drive Bridge and the adjacent Nimitz Bridge, which is now used by pedestrians. The grass in the distance is part of the Liberty Station Esplanade.
Resting on a bench at the west end of Spanish Landing Park, just gazing out at a beautiful scene.
People rest on a bench at the west end of Spanish Landing Park, gazing out at a beautiful scene.
Sailboats, paddleboards and boats of every type out on blue San Diego Bay. The Pacific Ocean lies just beyond the peninsula of Point Loma, in the distance.
Sailboats, paddleboards and boats of every type out on blue San Diego Bay. The Pacific Ocean lies just beyond the peninsula of Point Loma, in the distance.

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San Salvador galleon to be launched on barge!

San Salvador, an approximate reproduction of explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo's historic galleon, undergoes final preparation at Spanish Landing in San Diego.
San Salvador, a close reproduction of explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo’s historic galleon, undergoes final preparation at Spanish Landing in San Diego.

San Salvador’s masts and bowsprit have been installed!

I swung by the amazing ship’s build site this morning after doing a couple errands in Point Loma.  Additional work was underway on the bowsprit, and the hull appears almost finished. One gentleman was painting white Roman numerals on the bow which will indicate the ship’s depth.

Complications and unforeseen difficulties have delayed the launch of the Spanish galleon, but now the full-scale, seaworthy replica of explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo’s historic ship is almost ready to be placed into San Diego Bay!

As I write this, very little updated information can be found concerning the upcoming launch of San Salvador. When the ship was weighed some months ago, it came in at 20 tons more than expected. Due to logistics, plans to use a crane to transport the ship to Broadway Pier were necessarily altered, then ultimately discarded.

I received some info on the museum’s new plan during a short conversation with Al Sorkin, aka Captain Swordfish, a few days ago while I was walking along the Embarcadero. He indicated the San Salvador will be turned, then rolled over a temporary bridge onto a barge behind Harbor Island. The barge will then transport the galleon to a local shipyard, where a crane will finally hoist San Salvador into San Diego Bay.

The plan, as I understood it, is to add ballast and complete the ship’s rigging while it’s docked by the Maritime Museum. I also heard that the museum hopes San Salvador is ready to lead other tall ships into San Diego Bay for the ceremonial parade at this year’s Festival of Sail!  That would be very cool!

Maritime Museum of San Diego volunteers work on the bowsprit, before San Salvador is eventually moved onto a barge, then hoisted at a local shipyard into the bay.
Maritime Museum of San Diego volunteers work on the bowsprit, before San Salvador is eventually moved onto a barge, then hoisted at a local shipyard into the bay.
A temporary bridge will be built in the coming weeks to allow the large San Salvador Spanish galleon to be rolled onto a barge.
A temporary “bridge” will be built across this path in the coming weeks to allow the large San Salvador Spanish galleon to be rolled onto a barge.
While the masts are now in, yards are still being prepared. As I understand it, they'll be installed along with the ballast, once San Salvador is afloat near the Maritime Museum.
While the masts are now in, yards are still being prepared. As I understand it, they’ll be installed along with the ballast, once San Salvador is afloat near the Maritime Museum.
Guys work on the bowsprit in early July 2015. The hope is that San Salvador leads this year's Festival of Sail's parade of tall ships into San Diego Bay!
Guys work on the bowsprit in early July. The hope is that San Salvador leads the 2015 Festival of Sail’s parade of tall ships into San Diego Bay!

UPDATE!

As of 7/29/15, the San Salvador is afloat on San Diego Bay! A week ago a barge transported the replica galleon to Chula Vista in our South Bay, where today it was lifted into the water. I learned this afternoon that in fact the ballast will be added and rigging completed in Chula Vista, in a place that is closed to the public. The ship will have to undergo extensive testing by the Coast Guard before being declared seaworthy. It’s still hoped everything will be completed in time for the Festival of Sail, which takes place in a little over a month!

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Photos: amazing tour of Spanish galleon build site!

Sign at entrance to San Salvador build site. You have a couple more weeks to visit before the replica galleon's historic launch into San Diego Bay.
Sign at entrance to San Salvador build site. You have a couple more weeks to visit before the replica galleon’s historic launch into San Diego Bay.

Yesterday I enjoyed a tour of something so unbelievably cool it almost defies description. Along with my photographs I took some notes, but what I’m about to write might not be perfectly accurate. I’m relying to an extent on memory, which with my advancing age isn’t quite what it used to be. So if anyone reading my captions spots an error, PLEASE write a comment at the bottom of this blog post!

Later this month, the Maritime Museum of San Diego will be launching its absolutely fantastic, historically accurate, seaworthy replica of the galleon San Salvador. The original San Salvador was the ship that Portuguese explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo sailed in during his voyage of discovery up the California coast on behalf of Spain. The famous galleon entered San Diego Bay in 1542, making Cabrillo the first European to visit the large, natural harbor. What we call San Diego today he named San Miguel.

Today, the full-size working replica of Cabrillo’s ship is being built at the west end of Spanish Landing, in an area called San Salvador Village, between Harbor Island and San Diego International Airport. The finished ship will be 92 feet long with a beam of 24 feet. As I understand it, construction has been underway for about four years, and for a variety of reasons has taken a couple years longer than originally projected. But once the decks are re-caulked, the shrouds tarred, and a few other things finished, the ship’s exterior will finally be ready for its imminent introduction into San Diego Bay!

The galleon, which without ballast weighs about 130 tons, will be slowly towed to the Broadway Pier downtown, then lifted by a huge crane into the bay. While docked beside the other ships of the Maritime Museum, the interior will be finished, about 60 more tons of lead ballast added, and the vessel’s ability to remain upright thoroughly tested by the Coast Guard.

(Don’t quote me on the 130 tons and 60 tons. Those figures came entirely from my leaky memory.)

There’s simply too much awesome stuff to describe in a few paragraphs, so let me now show you my photographs and I’ll include in the captions some of the cool stuff I learned or observed…

Shipbuilding was the first industrial activity of the New World. Gift shop at site entrance includes Spanish conquistador helmets and breastplate.
Shipbuilding was the first industrial activity of the New World. Gift shop at site entrance includes Spanish conquistador helmets and breastplate.
Poster shows personal arms and protective clothing used by the men who sailed with Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo five centuries ago.
Poster shows personal arms and protective clothing used by the men who sailed with Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo five centuries ago.
A small museum and gift shop includes many interesting sights, including a shirt of chainmail and flag of the Spanish Empire.
A small museum and gift shop includes many interesting sights, including a shirt of chain mail and flag of the Spanish Empire.
Diagram shows the sail plan for historic galleon San Salvador.
Diagram shows the sail plan for historic galleon San Salvador.
Various items on display include lantern, candle, bottle, ship's food and native Kumeyaay artifacts.
Various items on display include lantern, candle, bottle, ship’s food and native Kumeyaay artifacts.
Outside, at the build site, there are many more exhibits. This reproduction of found rock art seems to be of sailing ships. The native Kumeyaay people often visited San Diego Bay.
Outside, at the build site, there are many more exhibits. This reproduction of found rock art seems to show sailing ships. The native Kumeyaay people often visited San Diego Bay.
First Contact. If this rock art is a Kumeyaay depiction of Cabrillo's expedition, it might be the oldest graphic representation of a recorded event in American history.
First Contact. If this rock art is a Kumeyaay depiction of Cabrillo’s expedition, it might be the oldest graphic representation of a recorded event in American history.
Here's a huge anchor! I didn't ask, but I assume it will be used by the San Salvador.
Here’s a huge anchor! I didn’t ask, but I assume it will be used by the San Salvador.
San Salvador carries six sails totaling a little less than 5000 square feet. The sails are not only used to propel the ship, but exert a larger influence on steering than the rudder.
San Salvador carries six sails totaling a little less than 5000 square feet. The sails are not only used to propel the ship, but exert a larger influence on steering than the rudder.
View of a small sail suspended from a yard, with Harbor Drive in background beyond the build site.
View of a small sail suspended from a yard, with Harbor Drive in the background north of the build site.
Suspended from a crane is a shroud (rigging that helps hold a mast) that's being tarred. The bow of the galleon comes to a sharp point at its beak.
Suspended from a crane is a shroud (rigging that helps hold a mast) that’s being tarred. The bow of the galleon comes to a sharp point at its beak.
Iron in an undeveloped region of the New World was a precious commodity. Imported ingots were often used to forge various fittings and hardware.
Iron in an undeveloped region of the New World was a precious commodity. Imported ingots were often used to forge various fittings and hardware.
Hooks, chain links and other iron instruments were crucial to sail and maintain a large ship.
Hooks, chain links and other iron instruments were crucial to sail and maintain a large ship.
The San Salvador carried armament to defend the expedition from potential threats. The cannon-like bombard and swivel gun could be fired from the deck.
The San Salvador carried armament to defend the expedition from potential threats. The cannon-like bombard and swivel gun could be fired from the deck.
Two bombards on display at the San Salvador build site. They could fire shot about five pounds in weight and were mounted on wheels.
Two bombards on display at the San Salvador build site. They could fire shot about five pounds in weight and were mounted on wheels.
Detailed map of Cabrillo's route up the California coast. He found neither treasure, nor a passage to the Atlantic.
Detailed map of Cabrillo’s route up the California coast. He found neither treasure, nor a passage to the Atlantic.
There are no blueprints for the galleon San Salvador. To reconstruct the 16th century ship, the Maritime Museum of San Diego used scarce historical clues.
There are no blueprints for the galleon San Salvador. To reconstruct the 16th century ship, the Maritime Museum of San Diego used scarce historical clues.
It was difficult to find the right kinds of wood for different parts of the vessel. Both old and modern shipbuilding techniques were used.
It was difficult to find the right kinds of wood for different parts of the vessel. Both old and modern shipbuilding techniques were used.
Wood mast segments and yards are coasted with linseed oil, I believe. They'll be installed once the ship is afloat in San Diego Bay.
Wood mast segments and yards are coasted with linseed oil, I believe. They’ll be installed once the ship is afloat in San Diego Bay.
Approaching the impressive reproduction of the historic galleon. Just imagine going for an ocean sail in this!
Approaching the impressive reproduction of the historic galleon. Just imagine going for an ocean sail in this!
Detailed schematic shows framework and beams that support decking and hull.
Detailed schematic shows framework and beams that support decking and hull.
The master builder sets up keel, stem, sternpost and deadwood, locked together with long iron drifts. The master frame is then built.
The master builder sets up keel, stem, sternpost and deadwood, locked together with long iron drifts. The master frame is then built.
I believe these are the lower halves of two masts (main and fore), each ending in a crow's nest.
I believe these are the lower halves of two masts (main and fore), each ending in a crow’s nest.
A look at the hard wood hull of the galleon San Salvador at Spanish Landing.
A look at the super hard wood hull of the galleon San Salvador at Spanish Landing.
Volunteer tour guide shows how six segments of heavy lead are attached to the keel.
Volunteer tour guide shows how six segments of heavy lead are attached to the keel.
Each piece of lead weighs over 6000 pounds. The lead was originally used for the drop hammers of Rohr Industries in Chula Vista to form aircraft parts.
Each piece of lead weighs over 6000 pounds. The lead was originally used for the drop hammers of Rohr Industries in Chula Vista to form aircraft parts.
A small tour group investigates the amazing galleon on a sunny San Diego day!
A small tour group investigates the amazing galleon on a sunny San Diego day!
The high stern of San Salvador. The rudder is attached to a tiller. That propeller below (and eventual engine) is a modern convenience, unknown by Cabrillo!
The high stern of San Salvador. The rudder is attached to a tiller. That propeller below (and an eventual engine) is a modern convenience unknown by Cabrillo!
Our group climbed the steps of scaffolding to check out the hull, upper deck and aftcastle.
Our group climbed the steps of scaffolding to check out the hull, upper deck and aftcastle.
We're shown where the shrouds connect to the ship's side. The darker looking lower portion of the hull is made of hard wood, which is heavier than water.
We’re shown where a shroud connects to the ship’s side. The darker looking lower portion of the hull is made of hard wood, which is heavier than water.
We're almost on top!
We’re almost on top!
View of the San Salvador galleon while standing atop the aftcastle. Work to finish the vessel's deck and interior is underway.
View of the San Salvador galleon while standing atop the aftcastle. Work to finish the vessel’s deck and interior is underway.
This deck will be re-caulked this week using cotton, hemp rope and synthetic tar. Earlier caulking with less modern materials was unsuccessful, if I recall correctly.
This deck will be re-caulked soon using cotton, hemp rope and synthetic tar. Earlier caulking with less modern materials was unsuccessful, if I recall correctly.
Sketch of helmsman steering the galleon with a vertical lever attached to the rudder's tiller. He had a window to look through in the aftcastle.
Sketch of helmsman steering the galleon with a vertical lever attached to the rudder’s tiller. He had a window to look through in the aftcastle.
Looking back at the aftcastle and rearmost poop deck from the center of the upper deck. You can see the window through which the helmsman peered.
Looking back at the aftcastle and rearmost poop deck from the center of the upper deck. You can see the window through which the helmsman peered.
Capstan is a vertical timber that projects through the deck. Bars will be inserted and used by sailors to turn the capstan, hauling ropes or chains.
Capstan is a revolving vertical timber that projects through the deck. Bars will be inserted and used by sailors to turn the capstan, hauling ropes or chains.
This is one of five separate water-tight compartments being worked on below. Bunks will be contained here, for journeys out to the Channel Islands eventually.
This is one of five separate water-tight compartments being worked on below. Bunks will be contained here, for journeys out to the Channel Islands eventually.
Under the forecastle, looking toward the bow's beak. The two holes beside the rectangular chain locker are hawseholes, through which the anchor chain is lifted or lowered.
Under the forecastle, looking toward the bow’s beak. The two holes beside the rectangular chain locker are hawseholes, through which the anchor chain is lifted or lowered.
Looking straight down here you can see where the foremast and bowsprit are seated.
Looking straight down here you can see where the foremast and bowsprit are seated.
Wow! Is this cool! How often does one get to walk around an actual honest-to-goodness working galleon!
Wow! Is this cool! How often does one get to walk around an actual honest-to-goodness working galleon!

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Beating cancer with beautiful tile artwork.

HEALTH is written at base of tile mosaic on bench.
HEALTH is written at base of fantastic tile mosaic on bench.

A super long walk yesterday took me past Cancer Survivors Park at Spanish Landing, which is located between Harbor Island and the San Diego International Airport. I first blogged about the inspirational installation of art over a year ago.

The purpose of Cancer Survivors Park is to educate, provide hope and encourage appropriate, prompt medical treatment. A domed structure at one end contains beautiful tile benches designed by artist Marlo Bartels. Each differently colored bench invites restful meditation and is dedicated to a single idea written near the base.

Beautiful dome of San Diego's Cancer Survivors Park contains artistic tiled benches and words of encouragement.
Beautiful dome of San Diego’s Cancer Survivors Park contains artistic tiled benches and words of encouragement.
CELEBRATION
CELEBRATION
THRIVING
THRIVING
LOVE
LOVE
WELLNESS
WELLNESS
HOPE
HOPE
Gazing across grass toward bronze sculpture of people beating cancer through prompt treatment.
Gazing across grassy park toward bronze sculpture of people beating cancer through prompt, appropriate treatment.

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San Salvador galleon replica nears completion!

Seaworthy replica of galleon San Salvador built by San Diego Maritime Museum.
Seaworthy replica of galleon San Salvador built by San Diego Maritime Museum.

On my way to the Cabrillo Festival yesterday, I swung by Spanish Landing across from the airport to check out the San Salvador. As you might recall from my blog post from early last December, the San Salvador is a replica of the galleon sailed by explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo in 1542. The San Diego Maritime Museum is building it.

I was surprised to see the cool ship is nearly completed! Check out some pics I took over the surrounding fence! I spoke to a young volunteer who was working near the ship, and she told me the San Salvador is expected to launch in early 2015. The galleon will be sailing up the coast of California, recreating the historic trip by the famous explorer. And a documentary will be filmed during the voyage!

The peculiar-looking vessel will be able to navigate the open ocean, she assured me, and is ready to go today, but the folks building her are doing as much additional detail work as they can while the ship remains on dry land.

Bow modeled after historic ship sailed by explorer Cabrillo in 1542.
Bow modeled after historic galleon sailed by explorer Cabrillo in 1542.
Stern of the wooden galleon that will sail on the Pacific in early 2015.
Stern of the wooden galleon that will sail on the Pacific Ocean in early 2015.
View of the San Salvador and a huge mast from Harbor Drive sidewalk.
View of the San Salvador and a huge mast from Harbor Drive sidewalk.
People on the upper deck of the almost finished galleon.
People on the upper deck of the almost finished galleon.

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Cancer Survivors Park: Hope, beauty, healing.

Today with modern medicine there's a pretty good chance of beating cancer.
Today with modern medicine there’s a pretty good chance of beating cancer.

Cancer Survivors Park is located at Spanish Landing, across Harbor Drive from San Diego International Airport. It’s an inspiring place of hope, beauty and healing.

At the center of the park is an arrangement of bronze sculptures by renowned artist Victor Salmones, representing people from all walks of life dealing with cancer. The journey can be complicated and difficult. A walkway that meanders through the park features plaques containing useful, positive messages.

If you also feel inspired, please feel free to share.

Some people have been cured from every type of cancer.
Some people have been cured from every type of cancer.
People from all walks of life can get cancer.
People from all walks of life can get cancer.
Cancer is the most curable of all chronic diseases.
Cancer is the most curable of all chronic diseases.
Bronze forms represent people beginning to undergo medical treatment.
Bronze forms represent people beginning to undergo medical treatment.
Realize that cancer is a life threatening disease but some beat it. Make up your mind you will be one of those who do.
Realize that cancer is a life threatening disease but some beat it. Make up your mind you will be one of those who do.
People like you and I start the difficult journey to have their cancer eliminated.
People like you and I start the difficult journey to have their cancer eliminated.
Make a commitment to do everything in your power to help yourself fight the disease.
Make a commitment to do everything in your power to help yourself fight the disease.
Beginning cancer treatment can be a bit scary and confusing.
Beginning cancer treatment can be a bit scary and confusing.
Find a qualified doctor in whom you have confidence who believes he can successfully treat you.
Find a qualified doctor in whom you have confidence who believes he can successfully treat you.
Young lady begins cancer treatment, feeling uncertain.
Young lady begins cancer treatment, feeling uncertain.
Treat your cancer promptly, properly and thoroughly and have a positive mental attitude.
Treat your cancer promptly, properly and thoroughly and have a positive mental attitude.
Happy family emerges from cancer treatment with a brand new life.
Happy family emerges from cancer treatment with a brand new life.
Get state of the art treatment. Know all your options. Knowledge heals.
Get state of the art treatment. Know all your options. Knowledge heals.
Bicyclist rides through San Diego's Cancer Survivors Park.
Bicyclist rides through San Diego’s Cancer Survivors Park.
Cancer Survivors Park is located at Spanish Landing, near Lindbergh Field.
Cancer Survivors Park is located at Spanish Landing, near Lindbergh Field.

Cabrillo’s galleon San Salvador returns from past!

01 Cabrillo's flagship San Salvador being built on Spanish Landing.
Cabrillo’s flagship San Salvador being built on Spanish Landing.

Portuguese explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo discovered San Diego Bay on behalf of Spain in 1542.  His flagship was a galleon named San Salvador.  Today, almost 500 years later, a replica of the historic ship is being built on Spanish Landing, across from San Diego’s Lindbergh Field.  The ship is coming alive with the help of hard work from San Diego Maritime Museum volunteers, and it’s scheduled to be launched next year!  It will soon be another cool sight on the Embarcadero!

As you can see from this first photo, a great deal of progress has been made on the hull.  The detailed San Salvador recreation will be seaworthy and will sail out onto the broad ocean!  As it passes Point Loma, it will look like the ghost of Cabrillo has returned!  I remember seeing the hull about a year ago when there were only four or five “ribs” visible.

The public can visit the San Salvador build site.  You’ll see not only the ship, but various items of related interest, including the tools used centuries ago to construct a large galleon.

02 Another view of San Salvador ship replica build site.
Another view of San Salvador ship replica build site.

The walkway you see on the left runs the length of Spanish Landing, behind Harbor Island.

03 Maritime Museum volunteer works on San Salvador ship.
Maritime Museum volunteer works on San Salvador ship.

Several volunteers were working on the galleon.  Colorful banners were flying in the gentle sea breeze.

04 Blacksmith tools are some of the sights near the San Salvador.
Blacksmith tools are some of the sights near the San Salvador.

Lots of interesting stuff can be found about the build site.  Nobody was visiting at the moment, so this pic looks kind of empty.  I was told buses full of school kids often come by on educational field trips.

05 Volunteers work on the wooden hull of Maritime Museum's San Salvador ship.
Volunteers work on the wooden hull of Maritime Museum’s San Salvador ship.
06 Recreation of Kumeyaay village at San Salvador build site.
Recreation of Kumeyaay village at San Salvador build site.

This is the kind of primitive structure native San Diegans lived in at the time of Cabrillo’s “discovery” of the bay.

07 Working on the spars under Harbor Drive's boat channel bridge.
Working on the spars under Harbor Drive’s boat channel bridge.

This friendly lady greeted me as I walked under the Harbor Drive bridge.  She smiled for a photo.  She told me she was working on the ship’s spars for the sails.  I didn’t hear her words precisely, but I believe she’s coating them with linseed oil.

She asked if I wanted to volunteer.  A guy I met later asked the same thing!  They’d appreciate any help they can get!

08 Scraps of wood used to build replica of Cabrillo's historic ship.
Scraps of wood used to build replica of Cabrillo’s historic ship.

All this wood is being used in various ways by the shipbuilders.  It looks like a big lumber yard on the other side of Harbor Drive!

09 View of replica San Salvador from opposite side of Harbor Drive.
View of replica San Salvador from opposite side of Harbor Drive.