Bad food, consequences, and the Hotel Chill.

There's a great sale on expired (antiqued) sardine cans.
There’s a great sale on expired (antiqued) sardine cans.

For your enjoyment and edification, I now present some photographic humor…

No more Mister Rice guy.
No more Mister Rice guy.
Beer Bank.
Time to make a withdrawal at the Beer Bank.
This candy cane must be left over from last Christmas.
This candy cane must be left over from last Christmas.
Ugh.
What happens when you eat all that bad food.
A call goes out. Good thing they have two fire engines.
A distress call goes out. Good thing they have two fire engines.
I think I'll lie down. Welcome to the Hotel Chill.
I really need to lie down. Welcome to the Hotel Chill.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Photos of San Diego and Arizona Railway centennial!

People gather for the 100th Anniversary celebration of the San Diego and Arizona Railway at the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum in Campo.
People gather for the 100th Anniversary celebration of the San Diego and Arizona Railway at the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum in Campo.

Yesterday I attended an extraordinary event. The 100th Anniversary of the San Diego and Arizona Railway was celebrated at the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum in Campo!

Hundreds came out to the museum to enjoy special attractions, historical displays and old-time entertainment. Almost everybody rode an excursion train through the nearby countryside (you can see photos of the ride here) before gathering for lunch and a gold spike ceremony that reenacted much of the original ceremony a century ago.

Please enjoy the following photographs. Read the captions if you’d like to learn a little more about the history of the San Diego and Arizona Railway. (Click the images of signs and they’ll enlarge for easier reading.)

Many signs, plaques and historical markers can be found throughout the railroad museum's grounds.
Many signs, plaques and historical markers can be found throughout the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum’s grounds.
In 1916 rails reached Campo on the last transcontinental railway link built in the United States. The line was completed in 1919. The line was eventually purchased by MTS to gain right-of-way for the San Diego Trolley in the city of San Diego.
In 1916 rails reached Campo on the last transcontinental railway link built in the United States. The line was completed in 1919. The line was eventually purchased by MTS to gain right-of-way for the San Diego Trolley in the city of San Diego.
Visitors wait in line at the old Campo depot to pick up tickets for a train ride during the centennial event.
Visitors wait in line at the museum’s old Campo depot to pick up tickets for a train ride during the centennial event.
Heading around the old Campo depot toward the passenger platform.
Heading around the Campo depot toward the passenger platform.
Gazing out at a few of the many old rail cars owned by the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum.
Gazing out at a few of the many old rail cars owned by the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum.
Visitors check out a caboose and more railroad cars to one side of the historic Campo train depot.
Visitors check out a caboose and more railroad cars to one side of the historic Campo train depot.
A simulated hobo camp and interesting sign attract the attention of one gentleman.
A simulated hobo camp and interesting sign attract the attention of one gentleman.
Hobo code used symbols made with chalk or coal to provide directions and warnings to other hobos.
Hobo code used symbols made with chalk or coal to provide directions and warnings to other hobos.
A recreated hobo encampment with campfire.
A recreated hobo encampment with campfire.
On December 14, 1906 John D. Spreckels, with his brother Adolph, announced his intent to construct a railroad from San Diego to Yuma, Arizona.
On December 14, 1906 John D. Spreckels, with his brother Adolph, announced his intent to construct a railroad from San Diego to Yuma, Arizona.
On October 2, 1916 the first passenger trains to Campo were initiated. On November 15, 1919 the Gold Spike Limited brought dignitaries to Carriso Gorge siding. The Impossible Railroad was completed!
On October 2, 1916 the first passenger trains to Campo were initiated. On November 15, 1919 the Gold Spike Limited brought dignitaries to Carriso Gorge siding. The Impossible Railroad was completed!
On February 5, 1950 the first diesel-electric locomotive pulled a freight train over the mountains, in place of a steam locomotive.
On February 5, 1950 the first diesel-electric locomotive pulled a freight train over the mountains, in place of a steam locomotive.
Checking out history at the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum, with its extensive collection of railroad rolling stock.
Checking out history at the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum, with its extensive collection of railroad rolling stock.
The Chula Vista Live Steamers were present for the event. They brought some of their 7.5 inch gauge operating steam trains.
The Chula Vista Live Steamers were present for the event. They brought some of their 7.5 inch gauge operating steam trains.
On top of one flatcar is a huge turntable that was used for turning railroad locomotives and cars.
On top of one flatcar is a huge turntable that was once used for turning railroad locomotives and cars.
A cool photo of a nearby Southern Pacific locomotive through the transported turntable.
A cool photo of a nearby Southern Pacific locomotive through the transported turntable.
A sign maps the route of the San Diego and Arizona Railway from San Diego through Mexico to El Centro.
A sign maps the route of the San Diego and Arizona Railway from San Diego through Mexico to El Centro. There are plans to use this line for freight trains once again. There is also talk that a tourist train might in the future run between Tecate, Mexico and Campo, California.
A sign describes two wooden passenger coaches built in the late 19th century. Coach 239 is one of the oldest surviving railroad passenger car artifacts in the West.
A sign describes two wooden passenger coaches built in the late 19th century. Coach 239 is one of the oldest surviving railroad passenger car artifacts in the West.
Visitors check out an enormous old freight car.
Visitors check out an enormous old freight car.
Here comes the San Diego & Arizona Eastern MW 1003 1931 Ford Model AA Rail Fire Engine.
Here comes the San Diego & Arizona Eastern MW 1003 1931 Ford Model AA Rail Fire Engine.
Visitors to the event check out a working 1902 American steam fire engine.
Visitors to the event check out a working 1902 American steam fire engine.
The American was built in 1902 by the American Fire Engine Company. It was restored with the help of the California State Firefighters' Association, and is now valued at over half a million dollars.
The American was built in 1902 by the American Fire Engine Company. It was restored with the help of the California State Firefighters’ Association, and is now valued at over half a million dollars!
People check out some of the railroad equipment on display on the museum grounds.
People check out some of the railroad equipment on display on the museum grounds.
Reading a sign by the railway Section House, where railroad workers were housed along the track.
Reading a sign by the railway Section House, where railroad workers were housed along the track.
Passengers disembark from the day's first excursion train and arrive at the outdoor venue for the gold spike event, near the museum's Display Building.
Passengers disembark from the day’s first excursion train and arrive at the outdoor venue for the gold spike event, near the museum’s Display Building.
A hay ride pulls up to the Display Building area.
A hay ride pulls up to the Display Building area.
Dr. Solar was entertaining kids with his magical Good-Time, Sunshine, Traveling Medicine Show.
Dr. Solar was entertaining kids with his magical Good-Time, Sunshine, Traveling Medicine Show.
Dr. Solar holds his applause meter.
Dr. Solar holds his applause meter.
Vintage auto enthusiasts brought their Model A and Model T Fords and Horseless Carriages.
Vintage auto enthusiasts brought their Model A and Model T Fords and Horseless Carriages.
Some cool period costumes!
Some fancy period costumes!
Vintage automobiles and vintage trains!
Vintage automobiles and vintage trains!
People were lined up for lunch near some of the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum's many outdoor railroad cars.
People were lined up for lunch near some of the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum’s many outdoor railroad cars.
Checking out a very cool old steam locomotive!
Checking out a very cool old steam locomotive!
A little switch engine of the San Diego and Arizona Railway.
A little switch engine of the San Diego and Arizona Railway.
The 100th Anniversary gold spike ceremony is about to begin. A train with red, white and blue bunting on the nearby track will be part of the historical reenactment.
The 100th Anniversary gold spike ceremony is about to begin. A train with red, white and blue bunting on the nearby track will be part of the historical reenactment.
Buffalo Soldiers representing nearby Camp Lockett are the event's color guard.
Buffalo Soldiers representing nearby Camp Lockett are the event’s color guard.
The gold spike ceremony begins.
The gold spike ceremony begins.
Standing for the National Anthem.
Standing for the National Anthem.
The master of ceremonies would introduce numerous present-day dignitaries, and many speeches would follow.
The master of ceremonies would introduce numerous present-day dignitaries, and many speeches would follow.
Native Sons of the Golden West dedicate a plaque celebrating the 100th anniversary of the San Diego and Arizona Railway's completion.
Native Sons of the Golden West dedicate a plaque celebrating the 100th anniversary of the San Diego and Arizona Railway’s completion.
Descendants of John D. Spreckels are asked to stand by Diana Hyatt, President of the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum Association.
Descendants of John D. Spreckels are asked to stand by Diana Hyatt, President of the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum Association.
During the centennial ceremony, the original gold spike from 100 years ago was on display in a glass case nearby.
During the centennial ceremony, the original gold spike from 100 years ago was on display in a glass case nearby.
The original gold spike used to celebrate the completion of the San Diego and Arizona Railway in 1919.
The original gold spike used to celebrate the completion of the San Diego and Arizona Railway in 1919.
The San Diego City Guard Band plays the San Diego Progress March, written for the railway's completion 100 years ago and performed then by the 1919 version of the City Guard Band.
The San Diego City Guard Band plays the San Diego Progress March, written for the railway’s completion 100 years ago and performed then by the 1919 version of the City Guard Band.
The gold spike reenactment begins. Railroad workers arrive by handcar.
The gold spike reenactment begins. Railroad workers arrive by handcar.
The railroad workers carry the last section of track to be laid.
The railroad workers carry the last section of track to be laid.
Reenactment of workers completing a transcontinental railroad route.
Reenactment of workers completing a transcontinental railroad route.
History is remembered in Campo, California.
Railroad history comes to life in Campo, California.
Here come dignitaries from 1919, including San Diego Mayor Wilde and William Kettner.
Here come dignitaries from 1919, including San Diego Mayor Wilde and William Kettner.
Politicians and dignitaries from a century ago seem to return to life during the San Diego and Arizona Railway centennial.
Politicians and dignitaries from a century ago seem to return to life during the San Diego and Arizona Railway centennial. Each would read from the original speeches.
Photographers record history from one side of the gold spike reenactment.
Photographers record today’s history from one side of the gold spike reenactment.
John D. Spreckels arrives from the Gold Spike Limited train.
John D. Spreckels arrives from the Gold Spike Limited train.
The shiny gold spike is put into place.
The shiny gold spike is put into place.
John D. Spreckels, creator of the San Diego and Arizona Railway, hammers the final spike.
John D. Spreckels, creator of the San Diego and Arizona Railway, hammers the final spike.
Those attending the big centennial celebration assemble around the John D. Spreckels reenactor for a photograph.
Those attending the big centennial celebration assemble around the John D. Spreckels reenactor for a photograph.
History is made again on a sunny November day in 2019.
History is made again on a sunny November day in 2019.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

Firefighter heroes in a drill downtown.

During my walk this morning through downtown San Diego I saw numerous firefighters and fire engines participating in a Sunday fire drill. It was a simulation of an emergency in a high-rise.

I thought you might enjoy a few photos of these true heroes in action!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

History of firefighting at San Diego Firehouse Museum.

"Old La Jolla" hand drawn fire engine dating from 1886, on display at The San Diego Firehouse Museum.
“Old La Jolla” hand drawn fire engine dating from 1886, on display at The San Diego Firehouse Museum.

A simple but elegant old firehouse stands in downtown San Diego at the corner of Columbia Street and Cedar Street. Those who step inside are in for a very big surprise.

The San Diego Firehouse Museum today occupies what was once an active fire station–San Diego Fire Station No. 6. Located in Little Italy, this unique museum isn’t large, but it’s crammed with so much cool stuff and so much fascinating history, you could easily spend an hour enjoying the many exhibits. There are shiny red vintage fire engines, a steamer equipped with a huge boiler, antique hand pumpers, firefighting apparatus of every sort, helmets, badges, a big display of model vehicles, historical photographs . . . and just lots and lots of firefighting artifacts, dating as far back as the mid 1800s. Much of what you’ll see represents the history of firefighting in San Diego; other objects in the museum come from fire departments around the United States.

Here are some photos which I took during a recent visit. The volunteer on duty was very friendly and provided some interesting historical information. I learned that private events can be held in the old firehouse, and that kids love having birthday parties among all the fire engines. Museum admission is only 3 dollars for adults and 2 dollars for children and seniors. Quite a bargain!

The San Diego Firehouse Museum is manned by friendly firefighter volunteers. It's located in old Fire Station No. 6 at 1572 Columbia Street in Little Italy.
The San Diego Firehouse Museum is manned by friendly firefighter volunteers. It’s located in old Fire Station No. 6 at 1572 Columbia Street in Little Italy.
A look inside the Firehouse Museum, which is absolutely jam-packed with cool historical exhibits. Kids love this place.
A look inside the Firehouse Museum, which is absolutely jam-packed with cool historical exhibits. Kids love this place.
Two vintage fire engines in the old firehouse. The museum's walls are lined with interesting objects that tell the story of firefighting since the mid-1800s.
Two of the many vintage fire engines in the old firehouse. The museum’s walls are lined with interesting objects that tell the story of firefighting since the mid-1800s.
The San Diego Firehouse Museum was founded in 1962 and is operated by the nonprofit Pioneer Hook and Ladder Company.
The San Diego Firehouse Museum was founded in 1962 and is operated by the nonprofit Pioneer Hook and Ladder Company.
A closer look at a 1914 Seagrave Pumper. During my visit, I learned that fire engines are also called pumpers.
A closer look at a 1914 Seagrave Pumper. During my visit, I learned that fire engines are also called pumpers.
Three additional old fire engines can be seen in a second room inside old Fire Station No. 6.
Even more old fire engines can be seen in a second room inside old Fire Station No. 6.
Water pressure controls on the side of one pumper.
Water pressure controls on the side of one pumper.
This white fire engine was stationed at the 1915 Panama-California Exposition in Balboa Park. It can be seen in old photographs and postcards.
This white fire engine was stationed at the 1915 Panama-California Exposition in Balboa Park. It can be seen in old photographs and postcards.
Another look at the historic 1915 Panama-California Exposition fire engine. This section of the Firehouse Museum is a bit dark and close, which makes it hard to take a good wide photo.
Another look at the historic 1915 Panama-California Exposition fire engine. This section of the Firehouse Museum is a bit dark and close, which makes it hard to take a good wide photo.
One glass display case in the museum contains all sorts of old fire fighter helmets and protective headgear.
This glass display case in the museum contains all sorts of old fire fighter helmets and protective headgear.
One corner of the Firehouse Museum showcases many old fire insurance marks which were affixed to buildings. One of these marks dates back to 1714.
One corner of the Firehouse Museum showcases many old fire insurance marks which were affixed to buildings. One of these marks dates back to 1714.
Smokey Bear welcomes visitors to The San Diego Firehouse Museum.
Smokey Bear welcomes visitors to The San Diego Firehouse Museum.
One wall features a collection of old fire extinguishers.
One wall features a collection of old fire extinguishers.
The Ely Adapter was invented by San Diego Fire Department's Assistant Chief Robert Ely.
The Ely Adapter was invented by San Diego Fire Department’s Assistant Chief Robert Ely.
Felt and paper stovepipe hats once worn by firefighters during parades.
Felt and paper stovepipe hats once worn by firefighters during parades.
Model of 1899 Metropolitan Steamer with 1911 Christie tractor.
Model of 1899 Metropolitan Steamer with 1911 Christie tractor.
Another display case at The San Diego Firehouse Museum contains all sorts of interesting old artifacts.
Another display case at The San Diego Firehouse Museum contains all sorts of interesting old artifacts.
A third room in the Firehouse Museum contains this 1903 coal burning steamer. Fire heats the boiler water making steam which activates a piston that pumps water.
A third room in the Firehouse Museum contains this 1903 coal burning steamer. Fire heats the boiler water, making steam, which activates a piston that pumps water.
Stairs once used by scrambling firefighters when old Fire Station No. 6 was operational.
Stairs once used by scrambling firefighters when old Fire Station No. 6 was operational.
An old photo of San Diego Fire Station No. 4 and its personnel.
An old photo of San Diego Fire Station No. 4 and its personnel.
Photos of the San Diego Fire Department testing their new Ahrens Steamer at the courthouse on Broadway and Front Street in 1906.
Photos of the San Diego Fire Department testing their new Ahrens Steamer at the courthouse on Broadway and Front Street in 1906.
A collection of colorful old hand pumpers at The San Diego Firehouse Museum.
A collection of colorful antique hand pumpers at The San Diego Firehouse Museum.
The San Diego Firehouse Museum is fantastic place to learn a bit about San Diego and the history of firefighting.
The San Diego Firehouse Museum is fantastic place to learn a bit about San Diego and the history of firefighting.

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of interesting photos for you to enjoy!

Heroes at San Diego 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb.

San Diego 911 Memorial Stair Climb sign and building.
San Diego 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb sign and event building.

I saw on the news this morning that a special event was being held to remember the firemen and other heroes who responded with selfless courage during the 9/11 attack, thirteen years ago. Firefighters, wearing full gear, would climb ninety stories of stairs, simulating a climb of the World Trade Center towers shortly after they were struck.

My meandering Sunday walk around downtown started late, and by the time I was near the Convention Center, it was early afternoon. But I figured I’d swing around to the tall Hilton hotel to see if the event was still underway.

The stair climbing was over. But many firefighters and emergency responders from San Diego and the surrounding region were still in the park in front of the thirty story Hilton, enjoying food and fellowship.

I personally can’t imagine climbing the equivalent of three tall Hilton hotel buildings wearing all that awkward, extremely heavy gear! These heroes of today, with all of their might, honored the memory of those who endangered their own lives trying to save others.

Firefighters on anniversary of 911 passed under American flag.
Firefighters on anniversary of 9/11 passed under an American flag.
Heavy firefighting gear flung off after a very difficult climb.
Heavy firefighting gear flung off after a very difficult climb.
Emergency responders and the public were invited to the meaningful event.
Emergency responders and the public were invited to the meaningful event.
A piece of the fallen World Trade Center on display by stage.
A piece of the fallen World Trade Center on display by stage.
Some firemen head home with gear after the Sunday morning event.
Some firemen head home with gear after the Sunday morning event.
Used firefighter turnout bags and skateboards sold in front of Hilton.
Used firefighter turnout bags and unique skateboards sold in front of Hilton.
This little house simulated fire fighting for children. They saved a teddy bear!
This little house simulated fire fighting for small children. They saved a teddy bear!
The selfless courage of 911 firefighters is honored.
A flag, a firetruck and many heroes.  The selfless courage of 9/11 firefighters is honored.

To enjoy future posts, you can “like” Cool San Diego Sights on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter.

Peek into the San Diego Firehouse Museum.

sign at the firehouse museum in little italy

If you’re ever in the Little Italy neighborhood in downtown San Diego, you might want to check out the small but jam-packed Firehouse Museum.

Shiny red fire trucks, interesting historical photos, old fire fighting apparatus, memorabilia and even Smokey Bear are on display. And excited kids can climb into one of the cool fire engines!

This sign by the sidewalk invites tourists and passersby to take a peek into the firehouse.

a peek at a cool firetruck and smokey bear

I took a photo from outside, aiming left.

old firetrucks in san diego firehouse museum

And then the above photo aiming right.

The next pic was taken on a later day, in the early morning when the museum was still closed…

The San Diego Firehouse Museum in the early morning.
The San Diego Firehouse Museum in the early morning.

A plaque appeared on the museum’s exterior in mid to late 2015!

Old Fire Station Number Six. From 1915 to 1970, San Diego Fire Department's original Fire Station 6 proudly served the community of Little Italy.
Old Fire Station Number Six. From 1915 to 1970, San Diego Fire Department’s original Fire Station 6 proudly served the community of Little Italy.

The plaque includes this fascinating information:

In the workshop on this site some of America’s most significant fire service innovations were created by the specialty trade-skilled firefighters who worked here, including the world’s first gas engine powered fireboat, the Bill Kettner. In 1963 the National Fire Protection Association declared the national standard thread the official fire hose thread of the United States of America. The machine which enabled this federal legislation was invented here six years earlier by inventor and battalion chief Robert Ely. The common thread allowed thousands of American firefighters to connect their fire hoses together, allowing them to work as one. As a result, countless lives and priceless amounts of property and the environment have been saved.

Follow this blog for more photos of cool stuff! Join me on Facebook or Twitter.