Has the Earth moved at Fault Line Park?

Fault Line Park in downtown San Diego’s East Village neighborhood made its debut a little over six years ago.

Has the Earth moved since then?

More specifically, has the Earth on either side of the Rose Canyon Fault System rupture just under the park moved since then?

Very unique public art in this city park helps casual observers determine whether any such movement has occurred. I first blogged about Fault Line Park and its two giant spheres in September, 2015. Revisit that old post by clicking here.

Back then I took a photograph through one of the spheres. The twin stainless steel spheres stand on opposite sides of the shallow underground rupture. Should the ground on either side move over time, the targeting crosshairs inside the one sphere will shift in relation to the other sphere.

Here’s a photo I took over six years ago…

Compare it to the next photo that I took early this morning.

Something is now stuck inside the sphere’s hollow tube, but you can see how the crosshairs still roughly center on the opposite sphere:

I know this isn’t scientific, but if there has been any movement of the ground on either side of the fault line, it appears to be very slight!

I’ll have to take another photo a few years from now!

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Listen to the Earth whisper at Fault Line Park!

Morning photo of the new Fault Line Park in San Diego's East Village. The Central Library's dome is visible in the background.
Morning photo of the new Fault Line Park in San Diego’s East Village. The Central Library’s dome is visible in the background.

An incredibly cool new public park opened in East Village a couple weeks ago. It’s called Fault Line Park, and is located south of Island Avenue between 14th and 15th Street. The park is situated directly above a shallow rupture of the Rose Canyon Fault System, which stretches through downtown San Diego.

In addition to a children’s playground and places to sit and walk, the 1.3 acre Fault Line Park contains a really unique feature. A public art installation, titled Fault Whisper, by artist Po Shu Wang of Living Lenses, allows visitors to monitor our active planet. Large, shining spheres stand on either side of the fault line.  At the west sphere, curious ears can listen to the Earth’s subterranean movements, which are recorded by a seismometer embedded below in the actual fault! They can also look through an eyepiece toward the opposite sphere, to see whether the Earth has shifted!

What brilliant, interesting artwork!

Even though I listened intently, I couldn’t hear the Earth whispering early this morning when I took these pics. Perhaps old Mother Earth was still sleeping!

This line marks where a part of the Rose Canyon Fault System has ruptured, just 14 feet below the surface. The fault line isn't considered dangerous.
This line marks where a part of the Rose Canyon Fault System has ruptured, just 14 feet below the surface. According to geologists, there’s no great earthquake danger here.

Photographer records cool reflections in one of the large stainless steel spheres in Fault Line Park.
Photographer records cool reflections in one of the large stainless steel spheres in Fault Line Park.

Plaque describes Fault Whisper public art, created by Po Shu Wang in 2014. Two spheres stand on either side of the fault line. From one you can listen to the Earth and monitor movement.
Plaque describes Fault Whisper public art, created by Po Shu Wang in 2014. Two spheres stand on either side of the fault line. From one you can listen to the Earth and monitor movement.

Here's the opening where you can press your ear to listen. There's a speaker just inside. The Earth's movements are translated into musical notes.
Here’s the opening where you can press your ear to listen. There’s a speaker just inside. The Earth’s movements are translated into musical notes.

Looking through the eyepiece at the opposing sphere. If the Pacific and North American tectonic plates have shifted since the art's installation, it isn't noticeable.
Looking through eyepiece at the opposing sphere. If the Pacific and North American tectonic plates have shifted since the art’s installation, it isn’t very noticeable.

Stella Public House restaurant in East Village is located right next to the cool new Fault Line Park.
Stella Public House restaurant in East Village is located right next to the cool new Fault Line Park.

If Stella Public House is as awesome as the super friendly employee I met, you'd better head over there at once!
If Stella Public House is as awesome as the super friendly employee I met, you’d better head over there at once!

View of Fault Line Park in East Village from outdoor patio shared by Stella Public House and Halcyon coffeehouse and cocktail lounge.
View of Fault Line Park in East Village from outdoor patio shared by Stella Public House and Halcyon coffeehouse and cocktail lounge.

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