Photos of aircraft restoration aboard USS Midway.

A tour of the USS Midway Museum often includes aircraft that are undergoing maintenance or restoration. Three helicopter rotors are being reconstructed here.
A self-guided tour of the USS Midway Museum often includes aircraft that are undergoing maintenance or restoration. Three helicopter rotors are being reconstructed here.

I love visiting the USS Midway Museum because there’s always something new to see. During my visit today I was intrigued by some of the aircraft restoration work that I observed.

The many different airplane and helicopter exhibits, representing different eras of naval aviation history, are already in pretty good condition when they are lifted aboard the aircraft carrier museum, but there’s always work to do. Time and the elements take their toll.

The USS Midway Museum is fortunate to have a small army (or should I say fleet) of skilled and knowledgeable volunteers. Many are retired Navy, with first-hand experience of the history and technical aspects of these aircraft. All are very friendly and welcome questions from museum visitors!

Sign on hangar deck of USS Midway describes the HO3S-1 Dragonfly's original rotor blade restoration, which is in progress.
Sign on hangar deck of USS Midway describes the HO3S-1 Dragonfly’s original rotor blade restoration, which is in progress.
A closer look at the spruce plywood ribs, which are spaced on the tubular steel spar.
A closer look at the spruce plywood ribs, which are spaced on the tubular steel spar.
This rotor is a bit further along. It appears part of the rotor's new surface is being cemented in place.
This rotor is a bit further along. It appears part of the rotor’s new surface is being cemented in place.
Here's the HO3S-1 Dragonfly helicopter up on the flight deck of USS Midway. Notice three of four rotors are missing.
Here’s the HO3S-1 Dragonfly helicopter up on the flight deck of USS Midway. Notice three of four rotors are missing.
The aptly named Dragonfly began service in 1946. You might recognize the design if you've seen the film The Bridges at Toko-Ri.
The aptly named Dragonfly began service in 1946. You might recognize the design if you’ve seen the film The Bridges at Toko-Ri.
Part of the Dragonfly's engine is exposed beneath the rotors.
Part of the Dragonfly’s engine is exposed beneath the rotors.
This USS Midway volunteer is grinding away rust from the museum's A-6 Intruder bomber. He said it's the type of work that is done between larger projects.
This USS Midway volunteer is grinding away rust from the museum’s A-6 Intruder bomber. He said it’s the type of work that is done between larger projects.
The tail of the A-6 Intruder is being refurbished and repainted, too.
The tail of the A-6 Intruder is being restored to look like new, too.
Many skilled volunteers at the USS Midway Museum work continuously to keep the many aircraft exhibits in great condition!
Many skilled volunteers at the USS Midway Museum work continuously to keep the many aircraft exhibits in great condition!

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Richard Schulte

Downtown San Diego has been my home for many years. My online activities reflect my love for writing, blogging, walking and photography.

4 thoughts on “Photos of aircraft restoration aboard USS Midway.”

      1. Yes, we had an airshow while out at sea. It was also incredible. A long day and lots of fun, a cook out on the hangar bay and an airshow… Lots of fun! Will always remember it, also I was 7 mths pregnant with our first, so, it was an exhausting day too!

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