Wasted grocery food turns to art in Balboa Park.

A little diving in San Diego grocery store dumpsters yielded lots of good food.
A little diving in San Diego grocery store dumpsters yielded lots of good food.

A unique event took place today. It was extremely unusual, fun and enlightening.

Rob Greenfield is an activist working to persuade grocery stores to donate expired foods to local food banks and hunger relief charities like Feeding America. His effort is called Donate Don’t Dump. To raise awareness, he has created unusual, colorful works of art in various cities, using perfectly good food he’s found while dumpster diving.

As part of my walk today, I took a few pics of Rob and his friends creating a fantastic bit of artwork on the grass in San Diego’s Balboa Park.

He told me that some grocery chains are better than others at donating their expired foods. He explained food retailers have nothing to fear from lawsuits should someone sicken from food poisoning, because of the federal Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act.  $165 billion dollars of food is wasted each year, enough to fill two Rose Bowl stadiums every single day, according to Rob!

Once the art had been admired, bystanders were invited to eat! The food was great!

Wasted food includes vegetables, baked goods and expired packaged items.
Wasted food includes vegetables, baked goods and expired packaged items.
Rob Greenfield checks salvaged food to be assembled into activist art in Balboa Park.
Rob Greenfield checks salvaged food to be assembled into activist art in Balboa Park.
Rob Greenfield explains his goals on a bench, with Casa del Prado arches in the background.
Rob Greenfield explains his goals on a bench, with Casa del Prado arches in the background.
Laying out the food articles into an elaborate, very colorful design has begun!
Laying out the food articles into an elaborate, very colorful design has begun!
A crowd watches near the Botanical Building as the food creation nears completion.
A crowd watches near the Botanical Building as the artistic food creation nears completion.
Rob Greenfield explains that more needs to be done to save perfectly good food.
Rob Greenfield explains that more needs to be done to save perfectly good food.

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Published by

Richard Schulte

Downtown San Diego has been my home for many years. My online activities reflect my love for writing, blogging, walking and photography.

2 thoughts on “Wasted grocery food turns to art in Balboa Park.”

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