Watching for rare birds at Tweet Street park.

Looking west along the narrow linear Cortez Hill Park, also called Tweet Street.
Looking west along the narrow linear Cortez Hill Park, also called Tweet Street.

Every day for the past six years I’ve been watching for rare birds.

As you might have read on this blog, I live at the top of Cortez Hill in downtown San Diego. One cool feature of my neighborhood is a modest but well-loved park that awaits a few steps from my front door. Cortez Hill Park, more commonly called Tweet Street, is an extremely narrow urban park that stretches for several blocks along Date Street and Tenth Avenue. Completed in 2008, it includes a small playground, dog rest areas, and benches where visitors can rest and enjoy the San Diego sunshine. But Tweet Street’s unique purpose is to provide an inviting refuge of trees, shrubs and birdhouses that encourages birds to take up residence!

I remember when Tweet Street first opened, and my excitement. The artistic, brightly painted birdhouses were simply fun to walk past, and the idea that the park would soon be full of birds put a spring in my step.

Years later, I’m still watching for birds. Occasionally one can be glimpsed or heard in the deeper parts of the trees, or down on the hillside above Interstate 5. But to see a bird near the sidewalk is a rare thing. I’ve never seen a single birdhouse being used.

I suppose the lesson is that birdhouses shouldn’t be erected 5 or 6 feet from a popular walkway, where many people pass throughout the day, often with dogs. And that birds need a little more cover than what an extremely narrow park provides. Don’t get me wrong, I love Tweet Street! I love how the trees have grown out. I love walking along the park and gazing out at different vistas. The idea of attracting birds was terrific. But birds have their own notions about where to live. It seems they prefer a little more privacy.

Metal artwork resembles a bird perched atop trees in the downtown community.
Metal artwork resembles a bird perched atop trees in the downtown community.
Houses for birds are creative works of imagination, built by local artists in 2008.
Houses for birds are creative works of imagination, built by local artists in 2008.
Birds might choose to live in this traffic light.
Birds might choose to live in this traffic light.
Display near center of park shows how to build a birdhouse.
Display near center of park shows how to build a birdhouse.
Bees have taken over this wooden birdhouse.
Bees have taken over this empty wooden birdhouse.
The eyes of this colorful cat invite birds to enter.
The eyes of this colorful, weather-beaten cat invite courageous birds to enter.
Human condos and apartments are across the street from vacant bird housing.
Human condos and apartments are across the street from vacant bird housing.
House finches are among the birds that visit the Tweet Street park.
House finches are among the birds that occasionally visit the Tweet Street park.
Another fanciful birdhouse in the downtown San Diego park.
Another fanciful but unused birdhouse in the downtown San Diego park.
Stylish birdhouse, palm tree and downtown buildings.
Stylish birdhouse, palm tree and downtown buildings.
Squirrel perched on fence above Interstate 5 at edge of Tweet Street park.
Squirrel perched on fence above Interstate 5 at edge of Tweet Street park.

To enjoy future posts, you can “like” Cool San Diego Sights on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter.

Published by

Richard Schulte

Downtown San Diego has been my home for many years. My online activities reflect my love for writing, blogging, walking and photography.

5 thoughts on “Watching for rare birds at Tweet Street park.”

  1. Many thanks to the city of San Diego, for this delight.
    It is now and will always be one of the country’s best cities!!
    I can smell the tacos at Old Town right now. Miss it all so much.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.