Historical plaque near Paradise Valley Hospital.

There’s a mysterious bronze plaque in National City near Paradise Valley Hospital.

You can see it on Euclid Avenue, north of 8th Street, right next to a bus stop and hospital sign. The archway to long-vanished Paradise Valley Sanitarium also stands nearby.

There’s no visible indication of who placed the plaque, or when. Just these words in bronze:

SITE OF ORIGINAL WELL

FAITH AND PRAYER WERE REWARDED IN
NOVEMBER 1904, FOR AT THIS SITE GOD
GAVE OUR PIONEERS WATER. MRS. ELLEN
G. WHITE IN REVEALING WHAT GOD HAD
SHOWN HER SAID, “IT MAY NOT BE AT THIS
SPOT, IT MAY BE SOMEWHERE ELSE ON THIS
ESTATE, BUT THERE IS PLENTY OF WATER
SOMEWHERE.” TO THIS DAY, THE SUPPLY HAS
NOT FAILED. OUR PRESENT WELL TAPS THE
SAME CHANNEL, BUT BECAUSE OF DRAINAGE
PROBLEMS IT IS ON A HIGHER LEVEL
APPROXIMATELY 700 YARDS EAST.

A little research indicates that the Ellen G. White mentioned was one of the founders of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

According to Wikipedia: In 1883, Dr. Anna L. Potts started construction of Mount Paradise Sanitarium seven miles from San Diego. The thirty room sanitarium was finished in 1887. But in 1895, lacking water and patients, Dr. Potts closed Potts Sanitarium…in 1900, Ellen G. White…repeatedly received strong impressions from God that the region was a good location for a sanitarium and hospital. During Mrs. White’s visit to San Diego in 1902, Paradise Sanitarium was for sale for $11,000. Real estate prices slowly declined as the drought continued…later Mrs. White and a wealthy friend, Mrs. Josephine Gotzain, bought it for $4,000. There still was no water, so Ellen White hired a well digger and water was found at 98 feet…

More history concerning Paradise Valley Sanitarium–which became a world-famous health resort, and which was eventually replaced by Paradise Valley Hospital–can be found on this page!

(As you can see in my above photograph, somebody tried to cover up the plaque’s text with black paint or ink.)

No copyright image of Paradise Valley Sanitarium from adventistdigitallibrary.org

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

You can easily explore Cool San Diego Sights by using the search box on my blog’s sidebar. Or click a tag! There are thousands upon thousands of photos for you to enjoy!

A very strange San Diego sight!

A strange liquid falls from the sky in San Diego. What is it?
A strange liquid falls from the sky in San Diego. What is it?

Umbrellas! In San Diego! My eyes must be deceiving me!

Who said it never rains in Southern California? Whoever that was, they must not have been downtown this morning!

It's only water. Perhaps we can cope. Most of these smart convention center visitors brought umbrellas!
It’s only water. Perhaps those of us who live in sunny San Diego can cope. Most of these smart convention center visitors brought umbrellas!

Honest-to-goodness rain has returned this winter, hopefully putting an end to our ongoing drought.
Honest-to-goodness rain has returned this winter, hopefully putting an end to our ongoing drought.

Umbrellas have sprouted like colorful flowers in the rain!
Umbrellas have sprouted like colorful flowers in the rain!

I live in downtown San Diego and love to walk around with my camera! You can follow Cool San Diego Sights via Facebook or Twitter!

Art exhibit: water, drought, and San Diego’s rainmaker.

The 9th floor gallery at San Diego's Central Library features an art exhibit called RAINMAKER. The theme is water, drought and climate change.
The 9th floor gallery at San Diego’s Central Library features an art exhibit called RAINMAKER. The theme is water, drought and climate change.

RAINMAKER is a fascinating, thought-provoking art exhibition at downtown San Diego’s Central Library. Because it will be coming to a close this weekend, I recently headed to the library’s 9th floor gallery to check it out.

Charles Hatfield was hired by the city of San Diego a hundred years ago to produce much-needed precipitation in order to fill Lake Morena. He might or might not have created the torrential rains and catastrophic flooding that followed his efforts at “moisture acceleration”. Was Hatfield an actual scientist or a charlatan? The question remains open.

This art exhibition focuses on the importance of water in our arid region, and how people affect and are influenced by the environment. Twelve local artists have contributed pieces which touch upon this theme. RAINMAKER is especially relevant today, considering San Diego’s current long drought, and the threat of coming winter storms caused by a strong El Niño that has developed in the Pacific Ocean.

Charles Hatfield, self-proclaimed rainmaker, was hired by the city of San Diego in 1915 to fill Lake Morena Reservoir during a severe drought. Record rain and floods ensued. Was this a coincidence?
Charles Hatfield, self-proclaimed rainmaker, was hired by the city of San Diego in 1915 to fill Lake Morena reservoir during a severe drought. Record rain and floods ensued. Was this a coincidence?

Photo at RAINMAKER exhibition shows catastrophic San Diego flooding caused by 30 inches of rain in 1915.
Photo at RAINMAKER exhibition shows catastrophic San Diego flooding caused by over 30 inches of rain in 1915.

Adam Belt, Willow Wash, 2015. Paint, graphite and reflective powder on canvas. Where is the boundary between science and magic.
Adam Belt, Willow Wash, 2015. Paint, graphite and reflective powder on canvas. Where is the boundary between science and magic?

Roman de Salvo, Joinery Blossom, 2013. Chinese elm, glue. Metaphor of Earth's ecosystem, with networks of family, community, interdependence.
Roman de Salvo, Joinery Blossom, 2013. Chinese elm, glue. Metaphor of Earth’s ecosystem, with networks of family, community, interdependence.

Eva Struble, Navy Yard, 2011. Oil and acrylic on canvas. This piece emerged from a trek through Brooklyn's Navy Yard. A vision of decay that is also expansive, waiting.
Eva Struble, Navy Yard, 2011. Oil and acrylic on canvas. This piece emerged from a trek through Brooklyn’s Navy Yard. A vision of decay that is also expansive, waiting.

Margaret Noble, I Have Arrived, 2015. Mixed media installation with 3 pedestals, 3 plant boxes, 3 sprinklers, and 3 handheld audio players. Lawns have been a symbol of status in society.
Margaret Noble, I Have Arrived, 2015. Mixed media installation with 3 pedestals, 3 plant boxes, 3 sprinklers, and 3 handheld audio players. Lawns have been a symbol of status in society.

Tools of the Rainmaker. The scales, measuring scoops and barometer in this case were donated to the San Diego Library in 1972 by Paul A. Hatfield, brother of rainmaker Charles M. Hatfield.
Tools of the Rainmaker. The scales, measuring scoops and barometer in this case were donated to the San Diego Library in 1972 by Paul A. Hatfield, brother of rainmaker Charles M. Hatfield.

Jim Wilsterman, Rain Event #10, 2011. Earth, fiber, raindrops. Somewhere between photograph, sculpture and painting, this art has recorded rainfall using clay and mud.
Jim Wilsterman, Rain Event #10, 2011. Earth, fiber, raindrops. Somewhere between photograph, sculpture and painting, this art has recorded rainfall using clay and mud.

Sheldon Wood, Drought Dreams, 2014. Watercolor on paper. With the lyrical movement of rain on a hot surface, references to petroglyphs and lost sinkholes, and an atmospheric perspective...
Sheldon Wood, Drought Dreams, 2014. Watercolor on paper. With the lyrical movement of rain on a hot surface, references to petroglyphs and lost sinkholes, and an atmospheric perspective…

Lisa Hutton, Supercell with Chickens, 2013. Graphite on paper. Environmental artwork depicts storm clouds.
Lisa Hutton, Supercell with Chickens, 2013. Graphite on paper. Environmental artwork depicts storm clouds.

Lisa Hutton, A Flood and a Fire, 2013. Graphite on paper. The catastrophic effects of environmental disasters.
Lisa Hutton, A Flood and a Fire, 2013. Graphite on paper. The catastrophic effects of environmental disasters.

Four pigment ink photographs of desert environment by Michael Feld record beauty and natural history.
Four pigment ink photographs of desert environment by Michael Feld record beauty and natural history.

Dominic Paul Miller, rain gatherer, 2008. Ink on mylar. Part of a larger body of work concerning uranium mining and the Navajo Nation, who have scant access to running water.
Dominic Paul Miller, rain gatherer, 2008. Ink on mylar. Part of a larger body of work concerning uranium mining and the Navajo Nation, who have scant access to running water.

Gabriel Kalmuss-Katz, Dear Hatfield, 2015. Speculative writing. Reflects modern anxiety associated with urbanization.
Gabriel Kalmuss-Katz, Dear Hatfield, 2015. Speculative writing. Reflects modern anxiety associated with urbanization.

RAINMAKER, a fascinating art exhibition at San Diego's Central Library, continues through November 29.
RAINMAKER, a fascinating art exhibition at San Diego’s Central Library, continues through November 29.

Join me for more cool sights on Facebook and Twitter!

Do you like to read inspirational, thought-provoking fiction? Visit my Short Stories by Richard writing blog!