Restored foremast installed on Star of India!

Member of the Maritime Museum of San Diego points to work being done on the Star of India while passersby watch with interest.
Member of the Maritime Museum of San Diego points to work being done on the Star of India while passersby watch with interest.

Look what I chanced upon today. As I approached the Embarcadero, I noticed a huge crane next to the Star of India. The restored top third of the foremast had just been installed! (You might recall from an earlier blog post this wooden section had suffered from rot and needed some work.)

While I stood and watched, the crane lifted two shrouds, one after another, to be attached to the foremast. Then came several cables! The activity above and below was fascinating to watch. I wish I had a more thorough understanding of all that I saw. Volunteers and employees of the Maritime Museum of San Diego were using their knowledge and skills to help preserve an important part of San Diego and world history!

Crane lifts up guys with a shroud, part of the tall ship's standing rigging, to be attached to the starboard side of the newly installed, refurbished top third of the foremast.
Crane lifts up guys with a shroud, part of the ship’s standing rigging, to be attached to the starboard side of the newly installed, refurbished top third of the foremast.
The ladder-like shroud dangles in the air, near the top of the foremast.
The ladder-like shroud dangles in the air, near the top of the foremast.
Volunteers and employees of the Maritime Museum of San Diego watch from the deck below.
Volunteers and employees of the Maritime Museum of San Diego watch from the deck below.
Working high in the San Diego sky, above the oldest active sailing ship in the world, Star of India.
Working high in the San Diego sky, above the oldest active sailing ship in the world.  The beautiful Star of India was built in 1863.
That first shroud is done. Those working on the Embarcadero beside the ship prepare the second shroud to be hoisted.
That first shroud is done. Those working on the Embarcadero beside the ship prepare the second shroud to be hoisted.
Now it's time to attach the second shroud to the port side.
Now it’s time to attach the second shroud to the port side.
Workers on the foremast grab hold.
A worker on the foremast grabs hold.
Back down again to solid ground!
Back down again to solid ground!
Lots of cables still need to be attached to the foremast, to help it resist the force of the wind, and gravity and inertia when the ship pitches and rolls.
Lots of cables still need to be attached to the foremast, to help it resist the force of the wind, plus gravity and inertia when the tall ship pitches and rolls.
One super strong, tarred cable awaiting installation is the starboard royal backstay. It will be attached to the masttop.
One super strong, tarred cable awaiting installation is the starboard royal backstay. It will be attached to the masttop.
Guys watch from the ship's rail.
Guys watch from the historic ship’s rail.
Up goes one of the many cables that are part of the forward rigging.
Up goes one of the many cables that are part of Star of India’s rigging.
A small bit of history.
A small bit of history in San Diego.
Up they go! I bet the view is great!
Up they go! I bet the view is great!
The bottom end of the cable was attached, now back up to the top of the foremast...
The bottom end of the cable is in place, now back up to the top of the foremast…
Up, up...
Up, up…
Higher...
Higher…
Intrigued by the operation, people watch from below. A member of the Maritime Museum of San Diego explains the proceedings.
Intrigued by the operation, people watch from below. A member of the Maritime Museum of San Diego explains the proceedings.
Another (pleasantly crooked) photo of a shroud being hoisted. I was told this work began early in the morning. As much work will be done today as possible!
Another photo of one shroud being hoisted. I was told this work began early in the morning. As much work will be done today as possible!

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Richard Schulte

Downtown San Diego has been my home for many years. My online activities reflect my love for writing, blogging, walking and photography.

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