World-famous ship Star of India needs YOUR help!

Decks don't last forever. Our Star's decks have reached the end of their lifetime and now Star of India is in need of YOUR help.
Decks don’t last forever. Our Star’s decks have reached the end of their lifetime and now Star of India is in need of YOUR help.

The Star of India is one of the most famous and important historic ships afloat. Built in 1863, she’s the oldest active sailing vessel in the world and the oldest iron-hulled merchant ship still on the water. She has sailed twenty-one times around the world, surviving the tempests of Cape Horn. She has been caught in a devastating cyclone, trapped in Alaskan ice, and even went aground in Hawaii. She still plies the Pacific Ocean with a volunteer crew. And her hull, cabins and equipment are almost completely original.

So it isn’t surprising the deck needs a bit of help.

The Star of India needs YOUR help!

Why should you help? Read this amazing message from the Maritime Museum of San Diego’s website:

“…Our museum is working as part of an international effort to see Star of India inscribed, along with other great historic ships, by UNESCO as a multi-national world heritage site. Like the Parthenon, the Pyramids, and the Great Wall of China, such a distinction would…see that she lives forever.

Wow!

Right now, the main deck and poop deck need replacing. The wooden decks have come to the end of their lifetime. The Star of India “was recently awarded a $192,000 National Parks Service Maritime Heritage Grant, one of very few such awards and a testimony to both her historical significance and to the viability of the project for extending her life. However, these funds are available to Star of India only if they are matched by an equal amount contributed by those who love her and want to see her sail for generations to come.”

With YOUR contribution, you can become part of an eternal legacy and help to preserve an important part of world (and San Diego) history. That’s big, very important stuff!

Please visit this webpage to learn how YOU can help!

Looking along the length of the main deck of Star of India. Deck replacement is needed and so is the generous help of the public.
Looking along the length of the main deck of Star of India. Deck replacement is needed and so is the generous help of the public.
Parts of the wooden deck are in pretty bad shape. Time, shoes, salt, sun and rain have taken their toll.
Parts of the wooden deck are in pretty bad shape. Feet, salt, sun and rain have taken their toll.
The Star of India is a National Historic Landmark. The oldest active sailing ship in the world, it's a treasured part of San Diego and world history.
The Star of India is a National Historic Landmark. The oldest active sailing ship in the world, it’s a treasured part of San Diego and world history.
Visitors descend from the poop deck. Beautiful woodwork is found all about the ship. But the elements can be harsh.
Visitors descend from the poop deck. Beautiful woodwork is found all about the ship. But the elements can be harsh.
A very old photo of Star of India's launching day in 1863. Originally it was named Euterpe.
A very old photo of Star of India’s launching day in 1863. Originally it was named Euterpe.
Photo of Euterpe, later renamed Star of India, docked at Port Chalmers, Otago, New Zealand in 1883.
Photo of Euterpe, later renamed Star of India, docked at Port Chalmers, Otago, New Zealand in 1883.
Exquisite section of the stained glass skylight in the teak and oak paneled salon of the Star of India.
Exquisite section of the stained glass skylight in the teak and oak paneled saloon of the Star of India.
Peeking into Star of India's forward house, which contains ropes, tools and instruments which were necessary to maintain and operate the ship.
Peeking into Star of India’s forward house, which contains ropes, tools and instruments which were necessary to maintain and operate the tall ship.
I believe that long timber supported by the forward house and forecastle is the top section of the foremast, which is being refurbished. But I might be mistaken.
I believe that long timber supported by the forward house and forecastle is the top section of the foremast, which is being refurbished. But I might be mistaken.
The Star of India's steering wheel and binnacle on the poop deck.
The Star of India’s steering wheel and binnacle on the poop deck.
The Star of India needs your help! Donate today to help replace the deck, and to preserve this amazing ship for generations to come.
The Star of India needs YOUR help! Donate today to help replace the deck, and to preserve this amazing ship for generations to come.

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Published by

Richard Schulte

Downtown San Diego has been my home for many years. My online activities reflect my love for writing, blogging, walking and photography.

5 thoughts on “World-famous ship Star of India needs YOUR help!”

  1. Fascinating! When I saw the name Euterpe, I thought, ‘Sounds familiar…I wonder if she ever…’ then scrolled a little further and saw the Port Chalmers photo. I’m certainly no expert on the days of sail, so I must have come across her when I was looking at early photos of Otago.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s a small world! During 25 years of her active life, Euterpe made 21 passages to New Zealand carrying passengers and freight from England–a trip that took from 100 to 143 days! (Maybe back then the world wasn’t so small–that’s an awfully long trip!)

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  2. Yes – I just went and did a rummage in my bookcase and found a book called “Over the Mountains of the Sea – Life on the Migrant Ships 1870-1885” by David Hastings, and saw that Euterpe features there. So that’s why the name and photo were so familiar. Sadly, the only other surviving immigrant ship is Edwin Fox – it would cost a fortune to restore her.
    http://www.edwinfoxsociety.com/

    Liked by 1 person

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