San Diego River trees recover from microburst.

The roots are almost completely torn out of the ground, but the stubborn tree in spring has green leaves!
The roots were almost completely torn out of the ground, but the stubborn tree in spring has green leaves!

Perhaps you read my blog post about the violent microburst that tore through San Diego’s Mission Valley on September 16, 2014. Along with photos of the aftermath, I described the tornado-like winds of the freak weather phenomenon.

A microburst is a localized downdraft of wind that can occur under unstable weather conditions. Several areas around San Diego were struck by a microburst that day, and the resulting damage was stunning. Small airplanes at an airport were tossed through the air.  Along the banks of the San Diego River, hundreds of trees were torn to shreds and uprooted.

This morning, 7 months later, I walked along the river path where I had scrambled over thickly fallen trees right after the natural disaster.

Many of the uprooted trees were removed by crews with chainsaws in the days that followed the microburst. But some were not. Check out a few pics from my walk this spring morning! Like the famous quote from the movie Jurassic Park, life finds a way!

One of hundreds of trees that were uprooted during the super violent microburst last September.
One of hundreds of trees that were uprooted during the super violent microburst last September.  Amazingly, this one still flourishes!
This fallen tree is now growing horizontally like a hedge along a Mission Valley sidewalk!
This fallen tree is now growing horizontally like a hedge along a Mission Valley sidewalk!
Sign beside the San Diego River Trail. Why fallen trees are okay! There are important benefits to the soil, flora and fauna.
Sign beside the San Diego River Trail. Why fallen trees are okay! There are important benefits to the soil, flora and fauna.

The sign reads:

When a tree falls most people want to remove it from where it has fallen. However, sometimes it is best if we urge people not to be too quick to tidy up. It is often very beneficial to leave the tree, mound of soil, rocks and roots lifted by the tree if they aren’t in the way or dangerous.

The soil eventually will settle as the wood rots, and these tree-root soil mounds are the real “windfall” for some plants and animals. Consider these examples: The bare soil on the mound is home for several mosses that prefer a drier spot free of competition. The space under the lifted roots makes a good place for an animal to dig a breeding den. Wet soil left behind can make a temporary pool for amphibians.

Green shoots look unusual on violently torn tree trunk. I believe this is a Fremont Cottonwood.
Green shoots look unusual on this violently torn tree trunk. I believe this is a Fremont Cottonwood.
Life springs from a broken stump after a devastating natural disaster.
Life springs forth from a broken stump months after a devastating natural disaster.

To enjoy future posts, you can “like” Cool San Diego Sights on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

Published by

Richard Schulte

Downtown San Diego has been my home for many years. My online activities reflect my love for writing, blogging, walking and photography.

One thought on “San Diego River trees recover from microburst.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.