Public art shows Coronado’s Tent City.

public art shows history of coronado island

“Imagine Tent City” is a cool bit of public art I discovered while walking along Coronado’s Glorietta Bay. The artwork is composed of photographic images arranged like a mosaic, embedded in ceramic tiles. It depicts the historic Tent City, which was a popular tourist destination for many years just south of the Hotel Del Coronado.

Established in 1900 by entrepreneur John D. Spreckels, the beach tents could be reached by Coronado Belt Line trains operated by the Coronado Railroad Company, running from San Diego around the bay and up the narrow Silver Strand. (Coronado is technically a peninsula, not an island.) The tracks have since been replaced by a very popular bike and pedestrian pathway.

mosaic of old photos shows coronado history

Here’s a pic taken from the south side, walking toward the Hotel Del Coronado’s old Boathouse. The building you see is part of the Coronado Shores condo complex.

And here’s a bunch more cool pics I took at the beginning of 2015…

Imagine Tent City was created by artist Todd Stands.
Imagine Tent City was created by artist Todd Stands.
Water skiing in the past, and present-day boats in Glorietta Bay Marina.
Water skiing in the past, and present-day boats in Glorietta Bay Marina.
Two ladies row a pleasure boat.
Two ladies row a pleasure boat.
Kids prepare to jump into the water!
Kids prepare to jump into the water!
Sailor and sweetheart beside a beach tent.
Sailor and sweetheart beside a beach tent.
Old photographic portrait and postcard of Tent City.
Old photographic portrait and postcard of Tent City.
Coronado Tent City News was a popular newspaper.
Coronado Tent City News was a popular newspaper.
One image in this amazing mosaic of Tent City history.
One image in this amazing mosaic of Tent City history.
A postcard shows a crowd around Pavilion at Tent City.
A postcard shows a crowd around Pavilion at Tent City.
Small child and mom have fun in the sand.
Small child and mom have fun in the sand.
More nostalgic postcards from historic vacation spot.
More nostalgic postcards from historic vacation spot.
Illustration of people playing and relaxing on Coronado Beach.
Illustration of people playing and relaxing on Coronado Beach.
Just hanging out at Tent City and enjoying life.
Just hanging out at Tent City and enjoying life.
Postcard image shows layout of Coronado's Tent City.
Postcard image shows layout of Coronado’s Tent City.
Photo of Victorian-style Boathouse, which resembles nearby Hotel del Coronado.
Photo of Victorian-style Boathouse, which resembles nearby Hotel del Coronado.
Historic 1887 boathouse on bay side of island near Hotel del Coronado.
Historic 1887 boathouse on bay side of island near Hotel del Coronado.

(This is a photo of the Boathouse as it appears today, a bit to the north up a sunny walkway.)

Another part of cool Imagine Tent City public artwork.
Another small part of Imagine Tent City public artwork.
Lady hangs sign on tent: Our Tenth Season 1909
Lady hangs sign on tent: Our Tenth Season 1909
Swimmers enjoy the huge sandy-bottomed Plunge.
Swimmers enjoy the huge sandy-bottomed Plunge.
Lots of vacationers out in the ocean water.
Lots of vacationers out in calm water–possibly San Diego Bay.
Bicyclist pauses to admire wonderful public art in Coronado.
Bicyclist pauses to admire wonderful public art in Coronado.

Published by

Richard Schulte

Downtown San Diego has been my home for many years. My online activities reflect my love for writing, blogging, walking and photography.

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